5 Bathroom Storage Mistakes (And How To Fix Them)

If you saw my master bathroom renovation at the end of last year, then you know I’ve had quite a few changes happening in the bathroom department in our house. I feel like each bathroom I’ve had since college has gotten a little better and a little more storage efficient each time until I’ve reached my pinnacle bathroom arrangement in this remodel. This is actually one of the smaller master bathrooms I’ve lived with square-footage-wise, so making use of all the possible space options has been extra important here. I’ll show you the mistakes I’ve made over the years and how I’ve fixed them now in this bathroom!

Mistake #1: Not making use of wall space. In our last house, I figured out the wall was actually a great area to store bathroom items. I made this wall storage DIY to help store makeup brushes and my most used makeup and I loved it! For this bathroom, I made a hidden medicine cabinet to store my daily skin care items and it keeps a lot of items off my counter (helping to keep it cleaner) and you would have no idea that it’s storing so much—it just looks like a cute print!

Mistake #2: Not using shelves for storage. It’s not uncommon to have a shelf in a bathroom, but I usually see them with more decorative items than with actual items of use. The key to maximizing your use of a shelf is to have a mix of purely decorate items along with pretty versions of items you actually use and hidden storage containers—think cotton swabs and Q-tips in glass containers, room spray in a glass spray bottle, pretty beauty items, marble canisters … that kind of thing! I also keep a lot of my smaller makeup items in a little 3-drawer organizer I keep on the shelf which keeps them all together, tidy, out of sight, but nearby as needed.

Mistake #3: Not having enough baskets and segmented bins. OK, so this is one that I’d been doing, but I count it here because I hadn’t been doing it nearly enough. Having a few bins with segments to separate items is good, but I eventually realized that it was optimal to fill pretty much every inch of space that I could with either a larger basket or a smaller segmented bin. Once I filled up every nook and cranny with a container of some sort, it seemed almost impossible for the storage to get messy and disorganized—everything has a spot!

I got a bunch of divided bins like these and these to sort my smaller items, some deeper bins for taller beauty things, large bins for lotions/hairspray, and some small bins of various sizes to fit anywhere there was an open spot (this non-slip liner works amazing to keep all your bins from sliding around as well). I’ve also always wanted one of these to organize my straightener/blow dryer (they have over-the-door or wall-mounted options too) and I love how it keeps them (and the cords) all nice and tidy. Basically, I would take some measurements of your drawers and the area under your sink and then buy a bunch of containers in all different sizes and just play around to find a configuration that works best for your space and what you want to store. Then, once you have what you need, just return all that you didn’t use! It’s a huge pain to try and get exactly everything you think you will need on the first go, so now when I organize (like I did with my hall closet) I just buy half the store of anything I might possibly use and then return the leftovers later. 

Mistake #4: Not having a laundry/cleaning section. OK, I think I may be most excited about this new addition to the pack. I can never find a clean washcloth when I want one, and if I can, it just ends up sitting around on my counter once it’s used because I can’t seem to remember to take it to the laundry pile and both problems have been so annoying. I finally bought a pack of black washcloths (black will hide any makeup stains) and they are all folded in a long bin under the sink now with a matching bin right behind it for all the dirty ones. I also use my DIY reusable makeup wipes, so I keep my mesh laundry bags for those in the bin as well so I can wash them all at once with the washcloths. We also use cloth napkins/rags instead of disposable options, so I just wash them all at the same time to fill out a load. Also, I hate having to hunt down a scrub brush or sponge when it’s time to clean the bathroom, so I got a little basket to fit a brush, sponge set, and some cleaner to keep in the sink cabinet at all times.

Mistake #5: Not keeping my most used items handy. This is one mistake that you will know right away if you are making it! If getting ready or taking off your makeup (or washing your face) at the end of the day is always frustrating because you have to dig that one, or two, or three things out of the back of wherever you are currently keeping it, then you have a location problem. Everything you use on a daily basis should be easily accessible and you shouldn’t have to hunt for anything. Put everything you usually use in one day on the counter and make it your mission to find a nearby spot (on the wall, shelf, or clearly visible in a top drawer) to keep that item.

I know sometimes I’ve kept some makeup in my purse makeup bag, so I’d have to find the bag in my purse each day to finish getting ready and then hopefully remember to put the bag back in before I left. In those cases, having multiples of certain fave makeup items will make getting ready so much smoother and you can leave your touch-up bag in your purse where it belongs. I also tend to put on jewelry right after I do my makeup in the bathroom, so I use some Command Clear strips to attach this acrylic necklace hanger to the inside wall of my cabinet so they are nearby as well. Since we have double sinks now with our bathroom makeover (we used to have a single one in the old setup), there’s definitely less counter space. So I tried to keep as much as I could off the counter this time and only have a small vanity organizer where I can keep my most used makeup brushes, toothpaste, and a spot for my glasses and earrings that I take off at night. It’s a great way to keep a few things handy while keeping clutter to a minimum.

There you go! I must say that I’m pretty excited to actually use this bathroom on a daily basis and have everything I need nearby. It also feels good to know that if we ever move I’ll know my favorite ways to organize a bathroom and I can set up a way that will work for that space pretty quickly. If you have a must-have item or tip you love for bathroom organizing, let me know in the comments! Hope doing a little organizing will get your year off to a good start as well! xo. Laura

Credits // Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Wooden Cleaning Set DIY for Kids

I love, love, love wooden toys for kids that are mini versions of grownup things (like this wooden princess phone I made for Lola last year). My toddler is super into wanting to help clean and wipe things down when we clean up around the house (she loves to vacuum with our mini dustbuster!) and when she saw a kid’s size cleaning set at a friend’s house she swept their kitchen for about 15 minutes. Kids just want to do what they see adults doing, so I thought it would be a really fun challenge to make her own cleaning set that was super duper cute but also totally functional. I even made removable dusting pads so I can throw them in the wash as needed, so she can really dust and clean just like the grownups do! I also love the little cleaning kits that have a stand, so I made a little coat rack-type stand to hang them all from as well and it fits perfectly in her playroom. Let’s get started!

For stand:
-1″ wooden handle wood leaf rake handle cut to 41″ long (keep the tapered end as one of your ends)
-12″ wooden circles (I stacked two circles that were 1/2″ thick)
-12″ wooden circle for star cutout (optional)
wooden knob foot with screw base
-4 small cup hooks

For broom:
-1″ wooden handle wood leaf rake handle cut to 37″ long (keep the tapered end as one of your ends)
brush head

For hand duster:
-1″ wooden pole (or leftover remnant from the wood leaf rake) cut to 13″ long
-6.5″ section of 2 1/2″ wide pool noodle (if the center hole is different from 1″ wide then get a wooden pole that matches the size for the handle)
-shaggy material for duster (I used this rug)

For floor duster:

-1″ wooden handle wood leaf rake handle cut to 35″ long (keep the tapered end as one of your ends)
-3/4″ x 1 1/5″ board cut to 1 1/2″ long pieces (you need two of these)
-1/2″ x 3 1/2″ board cut to 9″ long
-shaggy material for duster ( I used this rug)
velcro for attaching cloth to hard surfaces
3″ course thread hex bolt
1/4″ nut for bolt
washers for bolt (you need 2)
locking washer for bolt

General supplies:
-drill and drill bits
1″ hole saw for drill
-wood glue
-sandpaper
-hand saw, jigsaw or mitersaw
-hot glue gun
-thin leather cord for hanging items
snaps and snap setter
template for star shape (optional)

NOTE: I cut the lengths of these brooms and stand, which were made for an almost 3-year-old, so you can make them a little taller if you want for an older child.

OK! Let’s start with an easy one—the broom! Basically, you are going to take your cut tapered handle, put some wood glue on the tapered end, and insert it into the brush head. Once it’s dry, you can drill a small hole through the top of the handle (about 1 1/2″ from the top) and thread a leather cord through for hanging.


Next up is the floor duster! Take your rectangle of wood and mark where the center is with a pencil.

Your rake handle will be centered between your two small blocks and will pivot between them so space the blocks so there is enough room for your 1″ handle and two washers to fit between the blocks. Mark the desired location of the two blocks with tape or light pencil lines and then drill a hole with a 5/16″ drill bit centered through each block almost 1″ up from the bottom of the block. This will give your bolt a hole to go through to keep your rake handle in place. Glue your blocks in place on the wood surface. The wood glue felt super strong on mine but you can also run a screw up into each block from the bottom if you think your duster will encounter some rough play.

Place the tapered end of your rake handle between the two blocks and mark where the hole needs to be to keep the rake handle hovering over the wood so it can pivot freely (should be about 3/4″ from the bottom of the tapered pole). Drill your hole with your 5/16th drill bit and start with smaller drill bits to work your way up to that size so you don’t split the wood.

This is basically the order of the hardware when putting your setup together once your glue is set—you’ll put your bolt through the block on the left, then through a washer, through the rake, through another washer, through the next block, through a locking washer, and then through the nut on the end.

See? All together! Drill a small hole through the top of the handle (about 1 1/2″ from the top) and thread a leather cord through for hanging. We’ll make the fluffy cover for this in a few steps from now.

For the stand, you are going to glue your two circles together with wood glue and then use a 1″ hole saw to drill a hole in the center of the circle.

If you want to add a decorative element you can print out the star shape and trace it onto another piece of wood (only half fits on a page so just flip it to trace the other half) and cut it out with a jigsaw. Drill a hole in the middle with the hole saw and glue it to your base. Optional but it makes it extra cute. 
Check how big the screw is on your knob foot and drill a hole into the top of your cut rake handle (the flat side not the tapered side) so that you can screw in the knob onto the top of the handle (I think I ended up using a 5/16″ bit, but I did two smaller bits first to work up to that size so I wouldn’t split the wood).


Once your knob is attached, use a small drill bit to pre-drill 4 evenly spaced holes on the knob and screw in your cup hooks.

Double check the tapered end of your stick to see if it will stick out too far past the bottom of your stand once pounded in (and just cut a little off if you need to). Add some wood glue to the tapered end of your stick and use a rubber mallet or a hammer with a folded washcloth on top of the knob and gently hit the pole into the bottom of the stand. It’s helpful to use a level or square to make sure your pole isn’t crooked before letting the glue set. Now your stand is ready for action!

Now for the hand duster! Glue your wooden dowel into your pool noodle with some hot glue and let it set.

To make the cloth for our hand duster and floor duster, get two sections of fluffy or shaggy fabric and cut them to be 7.5″ x 9.5″ for your floor duster and 9.5″ x 9″ for the hand duster. I really liked the color and look of the bath mat I bought for mine, but I did have to do a binding all the way around the edges so it wouldn’t fall apart (I just took off and reused the binding from the mat). If you get one that’s woven differently or has that full rubber backing like some rugs and bath mats do, you may not need to do that step to keep it from unraveling.
For the hand duster, I folded over the fabric with the fluffy part inside (with the 9″ sides meeting up) and sewed up that side and along the top to make a pocket leaving the bottom open. Depending on how thick your fabric is this may be hard on a machine, so hand-sew if needed.

Then, I turned the fabric right side out and added two sets of snaps so I could pinch the opening closed around the handle once I added the noodle end in so it would stay in place when she’s using it. But I could unsnap them to remove it for washing.  
Add your cover over the noodle, snap your snaps, and drill a small hole through the top of the handle (about 1 1/2″ from the top) and thread a leather cord through for hanging. How cute is that!?


To complete your floor duster, sew four looped velcro strips (about 3″ long each) to the fabric side (two on each end) and stick four of the hooked sides onto the wood so it will stay in place for play but come off for washing as needed. Now your set is done and ready to hang!


It’s juuuuust too cute to watch her clean with this! I toyed around with the idea of making a wooden dust pan too, but then I saw this smiley face one and it was just too perfect for the set to pass up (and it saved me a little work as well, haha!). Overall, I love that she gets to participate in grownup chores now, but with tools that are just her size so she can help more easily (watching her with the full-size broom looks like a comedy routine). Do you have any mini helpers that would love to use this to help you clean too? xo. Laura

Credits // Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

When To Add (Or Remove) Light Fixtures In Your House

Technically, we’ve only lived in two houses that we’ve owned, but I feel like I’ve already had a lot of experience with this area of changing lighting in a home. For someone that’s newer to the renovation game, you may have walked into a house and not been super happy with the lighting setup but not really realized that it’s something you can totally change (and it shouldn’t be a whole giant ordeal like some renovation ideas can be). Our current house had quite a few lighting areas that we redid, so I’ll show you some of the main changes and why we made them and then I’ll show you our newest fixture location in our front room being planned and carried out as well …Remove lights that are unnecessary or an odd location: This light location seemed odd to me from the time we first entered the house. There was a long branch-like fixture with little spot lights on it, but there was nothing below it to light up other than a window ledge, so it just felt kind of useless. I could have tried to salvage the odd location with a new fixture in a style I liked better, but since I was pretty sure I never wanted to turn the light on at all, I just decided to have an electrician remove the light and smooth the ceiling like it was never there. Pretty inexpensive and quick to have done. Lights to remove in this category are ones that you look at and say, “Why is that there??”

Add lights that help define a space as separate: The opposite side of that long den room is a spot where we added a light! Over by the window I decided I wanted a little breakfast nook table and to make it feel like a separate “official” space I added this pendant globe light above it. It helps give light to the table since it’s a little far from the main light for the room (I have all overhead lights in the house on a dimmer so they are more of a soft glow as needed) and a light above the table signals that this is a separate area from the couch, and makes it feel more official than just a random table by a wall. I needed the help of an electrician on this one too as they had to add a connection for a light in that spot and tie it to a switch to make it functional (I used the old switch for that odd branch light by the window in the example above so that saved some money there!).

Change lights that aren’t flattering: If you feel like there are lights that aren’t flattering, you can switch the location! I know there are a million bathroom lights that are meant to go over the mirror (and cool looking ones at that), but it’s juuuuuuust not my favorite in a bathroom or anywhere there’s a mirror you’re looking in for a decent amount of time. No matter how pretty the fixture, I have never used a bathroom mirror with an overhead light and thought, “Wow, this lighting is really flattering!” Never. Anytime I’ve had that thought it’s always been with sconce lights where there are at least two lights on either side of the mirror near face height (or in some bathrooms that have more of the “ring light” type mirrors but that may be a little extreme for some tastes).

You can see we moved that location of lights with our electrician in our guest bath and it made a huge difference in there. That may be just a personal preference on the overhead vs. sconce debate, but that’s how I feel on that issue. Regardless of how you feel on that if there is a space where you feel like people look kind of ill when you look at them, think about where the lighting is and if it’s too harsh/bright or in a bad location. If it’s the location you can move the box to a different area to not be the only direct light source in the room. Or you can add a dimmer to not make the light so bright, change the warmth of your lightbulb color, or you can add some floor lamps or wall lights to help fill in the light and have it coming from other directions as well (or all of the above!).

Add lights when other lighting isn’t adequate and lamps are awkward: Speaking of adding more lights, the last tip is to add more lights when what you have isn’t quite cutting it and it still feels dim. I think most of us have been in houses or rooms where there’s one overhead light for the room, but it’s just not bright enough to where it feels a little dim and sad rather than dim and cozy. You can definitely fill in the lighting gap with some floor or table lamps (you can buy dimmer switch cords for lamps which I highly recommend) but also think about some wall mounted options. I added two of these DIY mid-century sconce lights on either side of our TV and they were perfect for filling in a light gap on that side of the room. There wasn’t really a space I could put a lamp that didn’t feel awkward or wouldn’t have a cord running across the floor. So the wall mounted lights were just what we needed and since they are plug-in lights I didn’t have to have an electrician install anything, so that made it a little more affordable too.OK, so for the present day example, you can see in this “before” photo of our front room that the dining table light is all the way on one side of the room and then there is just a long area with no light fixture at all. We have a couch, chair, and coffee table on the other side and it’s the main area where we sit and hang out for parties, but it’s just always felt too dark over there. Even with a lamp, I just don’t get the light coverage that I want in that 2/3 of the room and a light there will help designate that as a separate space as well. If this room was used for one purpose with one central action area (like a den that’s just for sitting or a dining room with only a table) and it needed two fixtures, I would probably center the fixtures evenly and use the same light for both spots like Elsie has in her den. But since the areas serve two different purposes and are decorated to be separate (our dining area has a painted wallpaper on that section), I chose this mid-century light as a complimentary cousin light of the chandelier in our dining room and I think they work really well together.

I had an electrician come out and add a light box for that area so we could install the fixture there and they put that light and the dining light in the same switch location so we could turn on and off the lights for the whole room in the same place. I also had them add separate dimmers for both lights so they can be controlled separately as well. I was laughing because when the workers were done, they said it looked so much better and it really balanced out the room to have the second light and I was like, “I know! I agree!”

See how pretty that looks? It absolutely does the duel purpose of adding light to that area of the room and defining the space as it’s own area—love it! I would definitely suggest having the same type and warmth of bulbs for fixtures in the same room. Otherwise, one can really stand out in a bad way if you have cool-toned LEDs in the one and warm incandescent bulbs in the other and they are on at the same time at night.

So now you know your lighting options when thinking about changing up the lighting in a home! It’s definitely a good thing to keep in mind when changing a space (or changing the functionality of a space you currently use) to know what’s possible and that it’s not a huge renovation project like some other home things can be. Hope these tips are helpful the next time you’re thinking about a lighting change! xo. Laura

Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Instant Pot Non-Dairy Yogurt (Cashew + Coconut Options)

For those of you who also make a lot of non-dairy choices, I feel like yogurt can be a tricky one. It’s so expensive to buy non-dairy yogurts, almost impossible to find ones without added refined sugar, and to be honest, I just don’t like the taste of most of them. So for a while I just gave up on yogurt altogether. It wasn’t until I got my instant pot that I decided it would be worth a try to make my own and so I’m glad I did! It’s not that hard at all and you can make a small or big batch depending on how much you go through, and you can use different kinds of non-dairy milk to suit your needs. I have an almond sensitivity, so I make coconut and cashew yogurt. I’ll show you how I make those!

For the coconut yogurt:

1 can of full-fat coconut milk (or coconut cream works too, try both and see which consistency you like better, although some coconut creams react oddly with the water and separates from it, which you don’t want)
1/2 cup water
2 teaspoons gelatin
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 probiotic capsule (I use this one)

Blend the can of coconut milk and water in a blender until smooth. Add the mixture to your instant pot and set to “boil” to heat up the mixture (my yogurt setting has a boil option if you press the yogurt button a few times, but yours may be different). Once it has boiled and the machine tells you it’s done, check the temperature and make sure it’s hit 180° (if it hasn’t you can run another “boil” cycle to heat it up more). Sprinkle in the gelatin while whisking vigorously so there are no clumps and allow the mixture to cool to about 105°. Using a digital instant read thermometer is by far the easiest way to check temps and you can use it for lots of other recipes too. You can wait 30 minutes or so for it to cool down in the instant pot chamber or you can remove the pot and place it on the counter or in some cool water to speed up the process.

Once 105° is reached, mix in the maple syrup and sprinkle the insides of the probiotic capsule (pull apart the two capsule halves) while whisking to combine. Let yogurt cook on the “yogurt” setting for 12-16 hours (some do up to 24 hours if they want tangier yogurt) and then remove the instant pot lid. The coconut yogurt will still look super watery with a thin white layer on top, so don’t think you’ve failed yet! It needs to set up in the fridge, so give it a whisk to combine again and pour it into a container to finish in the fridge for a few hours. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. Once the yogurt has set, it’s ready to eat!

*Note: Since you are dealing with an item that’s going to ferment, make sure all your utensils, bowls, measuring spoons, etc., are clean and sterilized before use (you can rinse them with boiled water to sterilize).

For the cashew yogurt:

1 cup raw cashews (soak overnight or for 30 minutes in hot water)
2 cups filtered water
1 1/2 teaspoon gelatin
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 probiotic capsule (I use this one)

Soak your cashews either overnight in water or for 30 minutes in hot water before making. Rinse the cashews twice in fresh water and add to blender with the filtered water. Blend for several minutes on high until smooth.

Add the mixture to your instant pot and set to “boil” to heat up the mixture (my yogurt setting has a boil option if you press the yogurt button a few times). Once the mixture has boiled and your machine beeps to signal it’s done, check the temperature to see if it’s up to 180° and sprinkle in the gelatin while whisking vigorously so there are no clumps. Allow the mixture to cool to about 105°, and, while whisking, add in the probiotic capsule (open up the two halves and sprinkle it in) and the maple syrup. Cook on the yogurt setting for 12-16 hours (the longer you cook it, the tangier it will be). The mixture will set up more in the fridge, so add it to an airtight container and place in the refrigerator. This recipe gives me a thick Greek-style yogurt which I love, but if that’s too thick for you, you can also add more water at the beginning to end up with a thinner yogurt or do a little less gelatin. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.

*Note: Since you are dealing with an item that’s going to ferment, make sure all your utensils, bowls, measuring spoons, etc., are clean and sterilized before use (you can rinse them with boiled water to sterilize).

As a side note, I see that a lot of people use about 1/4 cup of already made yogurt in place of the probiotic capsule to get the bacteria going, so that’s an option too. But I just haven’t tried it that way yet—it’s usually gone to where I don’t have any left to add back in! Also, I’ve seen recipes where people do pretty much the same thing but omit the gelatin if they want to make it vegan or add some agar agar instead. I haven’t tried that either, but I would try adding the same amount of agar agar as gelatin the first time you make it and then add more or less the next time if you want different results. You can also double the yogurt recipes above (or triple too, probably) if you want to make more at one time. My favorite way to top these yogurts is with some fruit, granola, and a little bit of honey or maple syrup! Yum! xo. Laura

Instant Pot Non-Dairy Yogurt

For the coconut yogurt:

  • 1 can of full-fat coconut milk (or coconut cream works too, try both and see which consistency you like better although some coconut creams react oddly with the water and separates from it, which you don’t want)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons gelatin
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 probiotic capsule

For the cashew yogurt:

  • 1 cup raw cashews (soak overnight or for 30 minutes in hot water)
  • 2 cups filtered water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon gelatin
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 probiotic capsule
  1. Blend the can of coconut milk and water in a blender until smooth. Add the mixture to your instant pot and set to “boil” to heat up the mixture (my yogurt setting has a boil option if you press the yogurt button a few times, but yours may be different). Once it has boiled and the machine tells you it’s done, check the temperature and make sure it’s hit 180° (if it hasn’t you can run another “boil” cycle to heat it up more).
  2. Sprinkle in the gelatin while whisking vigorously so there are no clumps and allow the mixture to cool to about 105°. Using a digital instant read thermometer is by far the easiest way to check temps and you can use it for lots of other recipes too. You can wait 30 minutes or so for it to cool down in the instant pot chamber or you can remove the pot and place it on the counter or in some cool water to speed up the process.
  3. Once 105° is reached, mix in the maple syrup and sprinkle the insides of the probiotic capsule (pull apart the two capsule halves) while whisking to combine. Let yogurt cook on the “yogurt” setting for 12-16 hours (some do up to 24 hours if they want tangier yogurt) and then remove the instant pot lid.
  4. The coconut yogurt will still look super watery with a thin white layer on top, so don’t think you’ve failed yet! It needs to set up in the fridge, so give it a whisk to combine again and pour it into a container to finish in the fridge for a few hours. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. Once the yogurt has set, it’s ready to eat!
  5. *Note: Since you are dealing with an item that’s going to ferment, make sure all your utensils, bowls, measuring spoons, etc., are clean and sterilized before use (you can rinse them with boiled water to sterilize).

For the cashew yogurt:

  1. Soak your cashews either overnight in water or for 30 minutes in hot water before making. Rinse the cashews twice in fresh water and add to blender with the filtered water. Blend for several minutes on high until smooth.
  2. Add the mixture to your instant pot and set to “boil” to heat up the mixture (my yogurt setting has a boil option if you press the yogurt button a few times). Once the mixture has boiled and your machine beeps to signal it’s done, check the temperature to see if it’s up to 180° and sprinkle in the gelatin while whisking vigorously so there are no clumps. Allow the mixture to cool to about 105°, and, while whisking, add in the probiotic capsule (open up the two halves and sprinkle it in) and the maple syrup.
  3. Cook on the yogurt setting for 12-16 hours (the longer you cook it, the tangier it will be). The mixture will set up more in the fridge, so add it to an airtight container and place in refrigerator. This recipe gives me a thick Greek-style yogurt which I love, but if that’s too thick for you you can also add more water at the beginning to end up with a thinner yogurt or do a little less gelatin. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.
  4. *Note: Since you are dealing with an item that’s going to ferment, make sure all your utensils, bowls, measuring spoons, etc., are clean and sterilized before use (you can rinse them with boiled water to sterilize).

Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

10 Things I Love Sunday

Welp, here we are into February and only 46 days until spring (but who’s counting?). Definitely trying to keep up the joy factor around the house as the cloudy days feel never ending, but little things like putting on makeup (which I don’t always do when just working at home) or doing some room refreshes have helped keep my spirits up. Here’s what else is making me smile this week:

1. That print on my mantel!

2. Keely mentioned loving a concealer in her post about clean beauty buys from Target, so I decided to try this concealer she mentioned when I ran out of my usual one and it’s great! Gotta combat those tired mom dark circles and it does an amazing job.

3. Love this little snack bowl.

4. In an effort to declutter my kitchen counter, I got one of these to look cute on it while secretly holding all our random vitamins and supplements that end up there (like elderberry gummies—hello flu and cold season!) and I LOVE it. It keeps them all contained and out of sight but within easy reach for whenever we need to access them. You could also put mail in here or anything else that clutters your kitchen counter, so I’m sure it will hold lots of things in the future!

5. The perfect spring/summer sunnies.

6. Can I just live in this romper every day?

7. If you’ve ever wanted a SMEG-style toaster but didn’t want to pay, like, $1,000 for a toaster, then this is the one for you! I think we’ve had the same basic toaster since we’ve been married (almost 10 years now), so I thought it might be time for an upgrade and it’s so cute. And if you’re wondering if it comes in pink … yes, it does.

8. Todd and Lola made a “spaceship train” out of boxes last week that we still have in our den and she drives it around every night. It makes me so happy to start to see her use her imagination to create more and more as she grows. She climbs into every empty box and immediately says “3, 2, 1, blastoff!” and starts to drive her new spaceship and I love it!

9. Cutest little toddler dress.

10. Still one of my favorite natural mascaras I’ve ever used and it smells so good! I’d kind of forgotten about it as I kept buying other brands, but I ordered another tube and it’s still one of the best.

No matter what season is happening in your area of the world, I hope you have lots of little joys to brighten up your week as well! You can browse our wishlist and Amazon store if you’re looking for a present to be excited for. xo. Laura