How I Refreshed My Kitchen Cabinets In One Afternoon

We moved into our Nashville home five years ago (man, time flies!) and the very first thing that we did was sand down and paint the dark wood kitchen cabinets white to bring some more light into the small kitchen. Let’s just say that five years (and one toddler) later, the paint job has gotten a little dingy and worn in places, and I’ve kept wondering when I’d ever have the time to refresh the cabinets since the original act of painting them was such a big process (they had some crazy glaze painted on so it took days of just sanding alone). When I really sat down to think about it recently,  I realized that it may not actually be as big of a job as it seems. And, once I made a plan I realized that I could actually do a full cabinet refresh in just one afternoon! That sounded way more doable than devoting a weekend to the job and once it was done it made a huge difference in how fresh the space feels—I’ll show you what I did!



You can see above in the before pictures that we were definitely in need of a refresh—five years of daily use really does leave a mark!

Clean and de-grime the cabinets: This step may sound like just a preparation for the real change later, but I was amazed at how much better the cabinets looked just by doing a thorough cleaning with a magic eraser. I could still see the spots where the paint was worn through but it felt so much cleaner overall and showed me where the paint was still in good shape— so I knew if I ran out of time I could skip repainting those areas. It’s also a good idea in a kitchen to use some dish soap and water to wipe down areas before repainting. Any grease from cooking that’s still on the paint may keep your touch-up paint from adhering properly, so you want to use some soapy water or degreaser product to get it off first. They also make these magic erasers that have soap in them so you can do both jobs in one! You can see above that the left side has been cleaned and the right hasn’t…even though there is still some chipped paint, they look so much newer already!

Give the wood a light sanding where you want to paint: Once your wood is clean, use some fine sandpaper to gently rough up the paint in the areas where you want to do a paint touch-up. You don’t want to sand through down to the wood so don’t feel like you need to sand very hard, just a light scuffing of the surface will help the new paint stick a little better. I liked using a sanding sponge with a foam back as I could sand an area and then wipe off the dust with soft foam part.

Add some touch-up paint to the bare spots: I like to use a brush for hard-to-reach areas of the cabinets but painting wherever I can reach with a foam roller really gives you the best look overall, so use that where you can on any flat areas (make sure to take off your cabinet knobs and pulls first). I was just going to paint the most worn areas of my doors, but once I got going, I realized that it’s actually pretty quick to do the full door or drawer when you’re just doing a touch up coat of the same color, so I just painted all the fronts and it really didn’t take much longer. And if you can take out your drawers first, that can make them a lot easier to paint as well.

As you can probably guess by now, I’m assuming you know what paint was used on the cabinets last time they were painted so you can get more for a touch-up, so if you don’t already have a way to keep track of what paint colors you use in your home, I highly recommend writing it down somewhere so you can reference the list as needed! If you don’t know the exact color, you can bring home a million paint swatches until you find one that looks super close, but you’ll probably need to paint the full cabinet door rather than just one corner in case the color isn’t a 1000% match.

Also, if you have a “kick plate” area like I do at the bottom of your cabinets (it’s where your baseboard/quarter round is near the floor), touching that up while you’re painting is a great idea as it gets kicked and scuffed a lot with your feet (hence the name)! It’s a relatively small area and it only took 4-5 minutes to repaint mine but it definitely helped the whole thing feel new again.

Replace old/worn knobs and pulls (or give the metal a cleaning): It was pretty obvious to me that tarnished hardware was another reason that our kitchen was looking a little grimy, so if that’s the case for you as well, giving your hardware a cleaning or a polish can also really help make them look as good as new-and you can work on it while your paint is drying so it won’t take any longer either! It may also be a good time to do a hardware upgrade if you chose a more budget-friendly option the first time around that hasn’t stood the test of time well (I personally love Schoolhouse hardware and find it wears really well over time).

How much better does that look in just a few hours!!

  If you have extra time, another thing that can make cabinets look new again is changing out the hinges that attach the cabinet doors to the wall. That is definitely more of time consuming task if you have to do a lot of them, but if yours are in bad shape, just make it a goal to switch out one or two doors a day with your power drill and that will make it feel more doable. It’s way more work to switch them out with different hinges that have different hole locations (you’d have to repair, fill, sand, and paint all the old hole locations) but if you’re using hardware with the same hole locations, it shouldn’t be that big of a deal.

There you go!! It really is amazing to me how much newer the cabinets look after just one afternoon of work—totally worth it! It feels like I spend most of my day in the kitchen so it’s definitely worth the effort to make it look it’s best. Hope this project idea helps to brighten up your kitchen too! xo. Laura

Credits // Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Striped Porch Floor DIY!

I don’t know about you, but I like to add a little bit of “fun” to my outdoor spaces … sometimes that may be done by simply adding pink chairs and a dartboard cabinet as I did in our carport-turned-patio-situation, or you can also do it by painting a pattern on an outdoor concrete floor! Now, I’ve painted a few porch floors in my time (this painted rug and this faux-tile pattern) and depending on what you want to paint, it can be a pretty time consuming project out in the hot sun. I wanted to do something a bit more colorful on our back patio that was a little faster to execute, so I decided that a rainbow of sherbet-colored stripes would add the perfect amount of fun to our outdoor space! Here’s what we did! Supplies:
concrete cleaner and brush or power washer
-painter’s tape
-paint rollers
concrete primer
-outdoor porch paint (I used, in order, Snow Pa by Valspar, Pirates Treasure by Valspar, Magic Wand by Valspar, Rachel Pink by Sherwin Williams, Coral Reef by Valspar, Sweet Lemon by Valspar, Coral Perfection by Sherwin Williams, and another stripe of Pirates Treasure by Valspar)
leaf blower (optional but helpful to clear small debris that may keep blowing onto the porch while you work)

First, you’ll want to clean your concrete floor with a cleaner and a brush to remove debris and any oils that will keep the paint from adhering. Once your porch is totally dry, you can use a roller and brush to paint a good layer of concrete primer onto your concrete. Once that is totally set (check the can for directions on how long to let it dry), you can use your painter’s tape to mark off your stripes!

Since I had a black and white pattern already painted on my porch, I decided to do a layer of white paint first just to make sure that the pattern wouldn’t come through. But you can skip that if you don’t have the same issue. We divided the porch into eight equal sections and stuck popsicle sticks in the ground at each end so you could see where the sections would be. You’ll want to use the painter’s tape to mark off every other stripe and once those colors are filled in you can move onto the stripes you missed the first round.
Use your paint and paint roller to fill in the color for the sections you’ve taped off. Do as many coats as you need to get full coverage and make sure to let them fully dry between each coat (check the weather before painting—you don’t want a rainstorm in the middle of your project!).

Once your every-other-stripe colors are done, we can move on to the ones in between with a little pro tip secret for getting clean tape lines when painting! Pull up your tape marks and retape so you are focusing on the stripes you missed in the first round. You’ll want to overlap the colors you just did a tiny bit with the second round of paint colors, so make sure you can see a sliver of those first round colors on the inside of the tape so you don’t have a white area between the stripes where you can see the primer underneath.

Once your second round of stripes are taped off, here’s the big pro tip: Paint all along the inside tape lines with the color that is next to your new stripe as you see above. Since it’s difficult not to get a little bit of paint bleed with painter’s tape, you are basically expecting to get some bleed. But because the paint that’s bleeding is already the color of that stripe, the bleed will be invisible and you’ll have a super crisp line when you paint your new color over the top of it and pull off the tape. It feels very wrong when you are doing it but it’s like magic …
Once your second round of stripes are dry, pull off the tape and see your new porch! Most porch paints will suggest leaving furniture and heavy foot traffic off of the porch for up to a week, so I would also suggest doing that if you can to allow the paint to fully set.

We actually noticed at this point that we were given incorrect paint for the purple and yellow stripes, so we had to go back and paint those over again (fun!). Maybe let a sample dry first to make sure yours is the correct shade, haha!
  Ahhh, it’s like a little slice of sherbet-colored outdoor heaven. I love how much color and fun it adds to the back porch and it just gives me the feeling of having drinks on the back porch of a cute Palm Springs restaurant or hotel. While it is true that a painted floor will fade some over time and get some stains from outdoor activities, you can also give it a good cleaning at the start of each season with a scrub brush or gentle power washer, and I like that I can always paint something new over it when I get tired of that pattern. Hope this happy pattern brightened your day a bit, too! xo. Laura

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Striped Porch Floor DIY

How to paint your concrete porch!
Author Laura Gummerman

Ingredients

  • concrete cleaner and brush or power washer
  • painter’s tape
  • paint rollers
  • concrete primer
  • outdoor porch paint (I used in order Snow Pa by Valspar, Pirates Treasure by Valspar, Magic Wand by Valspar, Rachel Pink by Sherwin Williams, Coral Reef by Valspar, Sweet Lemon by Valspar, Coral Perfection by Sherwin Williams, and another stripe of Pirates Treasure by Valspar)

Instructions

  • First, you’ll want to clean your concrete floor with a cleaner and a brush to remove debris and any oils that will keep the paint from adhering. Once your porch is totally dry, you can use a roller and brush to paint a good layer of concrete primer onto your concrete. Once that is totally set (check the can for directions on how long to let it dry), you can use your painter’s tape to mark off your stripes! We divided the porch into eight equal sections and stuck popsicle sticks in the ground at each end so you could see where the sections would be. You’ll want to use the painter’s tape to mark off every other stripe and once those colors are filled in you can move onto the stripes you missed the first round.
  • Use your paint and paint roller to fill in the color for the sections you’ve taped off. Do as many coats as you need to get full coverage and make sure to let them fully dry between each coat (check the weather before painting—you don’t want a rainstorm in the middle of your project!).
  • Once your every-other-stripe colors are done, we can move on to the ones in between with a little pro tip secret for getting clean tape lines when painting! Pull up your tape marks and retape so you are focusing on the stripes you missed in the first round. You’ll want to overlap the colors you just did a tiny bit with the second round of paint colors. So make sure you can see a sliver of those first round colors on the inside of the tape so you don’t have a white area between the stripes where you can see the primer underneath.
  • Once your second round of stripes are taped off, here’s the big pro tip: Paint all along the inside tape lines with the color that is next to your new stripe as you see above. Since it’s difficult not to get a little bit of paint bleed with painter’s tape, you are basically expecting to get some bleed. But because the paint that’s bleeding is already the color of that stripe, the bleed will be invisible and you’ll have a super crisp line when you paint your new color over the top of it and pull off the tape. It feels very wrong when you are doing it but it’s like magic …
  • Once your second round of stripes are dry, pull off the tape and see your new porch! Most porch paints will suggest leaving furniture and heavy foot traffic off of the porch for up to a week, so I would also suggest doing that if you can to allow the paint to fully set.
Credits // Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Project Assistant and Photography: Collin DuPree. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Our Favorite Summer Clothes for Kids!

I gotta say that one of my favorite things about summer is seeing toddler legs and arms again in all the summer styles! I’m a huge fan of this retro romper for Lola all summer long (we have it in several colors) and it helps to have a cute little sunhat for trips to the park or when we’ll be outside for a while. Here’s a few of our other favorite things to fill out your little one’s summer closet:
1 / 2 / 3 / 4 / 5 / 6 / 7 / 8 / 9 / 10 / 11 / 12 / 13 / 14 / 15 / 16 / 17 / 18 / 19 / 20 / 21 / 22 / 23 / 24 / 25

So many cute options!! Even if you are staying home a lot more this summer like we are, chances are your kids haven’t stopped growing out of everything they own, so you might as well stock up on something adorable to get you through the summer season. Can I get that kitty purse and Freddie Mercury shirt in my size, please? xo. Laura

P.S. Leave a comment with your favorite kid’s clothing company/maker. It’s always fun to learn about more options!

How I Keep Tropical/Desert Plants in a Cold Climate Location

Like a lot of you out there, I am kind of obsessed with warmer climate plants and succulents. Take me out to the desert or a tropical location and I’ll just be making mental notes of which plants I wish I could be growing in my yard back home. For a while, I kind of resigned myself to the fact that I’d have to stick with what plants are zoned for our particular climate (one that gets cold in the winter). But over the years, I’ve gathered a few tricks to be able to have some tropical/desert plants outside at my own home, and I’ll tell you what they are!

Find out if there are cold-hardy plants that can survive a winter in your area (you may be surprised): I didn’t realize that banana leaf trees could survive a Tennessee winter until I started seeing them around town and asked a local plant nursery about them. We also found that there are a few Tennessee native cacti species (pictured above) that can live through winter as well, so I got my hands on a few cacti paddles from a local nursery and have had to be patient while they grow (I guess those aren’t usually for sale full grown or they would be super expensive if they were). So there may be some plants that kind of die and come back each year in the spring that you can plant outdoors, and others may not be guaranteed but have a chance of coming back based on how cold it gets (those are a little more of a gamble but it pays off if they survive). Check with a local nursery to see what tropical/desert options you may have where you live!

Take note of special care instructions for desert/tropical plants: Sometimes these special plants need some extra care, so make sure to ask if there’s anything you need to do to “winterize” outdoor plants. For the banana leaf trees, you do need to do a couple of extra steps like cutting down the tree trunk before winter hits about 1 foot off the ground (and at an angle so the inside juices will drain out) and build a little mound of mulch or dirt around the base to help keep it warm (most plants will benefit from that step in the winter). It looks sad in the cold months but it will grow back fast once the warm weather starts. You can go from nothing to a tree about 6 feet high in only two months once spring hits—it’s crazy! Make sure to note if they need soil and rocks underneath them for good drainage too (I lost a full cactus crop by not knowing about that and had to start all over the next year).

Search for cold-hardy lookalike plants if what you want won’t survive: There may be some plants that won’t do well in your area in winter, but may have other similar looking plants that give you the same vibe. For example, agave won’t survive a Tennessee winter, but yuccas will and if you get the right variety, they look really similar and can totally give off a desert vibe and keep themselves alive each year.

Consider potted plants that can ride out winter indoors: An easy way to keep warm weather plants around is by leaving them in planters and then simply bringing them inside once the temperature drops too low outdoors. I always have a lot of plants inside during the winter for just that reason, and then once it warms up again, back outside they go! You’ll still want to keep in mind that these kinds of plants usually need as much light as you can give them, so if that’s the case, try and keep them in a sunny spot in your house to keep them happy and then gradually move them into more and more direct sunlight outside once the weather is warm enough.

And for the truly dedicated, plant what you want and dig it up each year: This may be a bit too much for some of you, but I really wanted to plant something that would compliment our outdoor Palm Springs vibes in my raised beds near our porch. But there’s no sun in that spot, so I was having a tough time figuring out what to plant. Things like ferns were the only thing I could find that were happy in the shade, but I’m just not a fern person—they just aren’t my vibe, so they were empty for a while. I knew that sansevierias (a.k.a. snake plants, a.k.a. mother-in-law tongue plants) would be happy in the shade, but they wouldn’t survive the winter. So I asked the local nursery if I could just buy a bunch of sansevierias and pull them apart to spread them throughout the bed for the spring/summer/fall, and then just pull them all out again and put them in planters inside for the winter. He said he didn’t see why that wouldn’t work as long as I didn’t mind the extra effort, and 10 seconds later my cart was full of plants. It totally works!

I will admit that I have a lot of sansevierias in my home in the winter, but it’s hard for me to feel like I have too many plants, so I’m totally fine with it. Now, not every plant may be able to handle being moved around like that (sansevierias are notoriously pretty tough), but if it can handle it, then you may be able to get away with it too! We also have a 10-foot tall cactus next to our porch that started out 3 feet tall about 4 years ago, and every year we plant him outside by our porch and then dig up his root ball and bring him inside to winter. You definitely want some thick leather gloves when dealing with that bad boy, but it works and he makes us so happy to see outside!

Treat some plants as “annuals”: OK, this category is for a plant that you want that won’t survive outside or inside over the winter. Bismarck palms are in this category for me as they do great outside over the summer, but just don’t get enough light in my house to survive indoors, and it’s too cold for them outside. Generally, I’ll just bring them in once it gets cold and enjoy them until they die and then get new ones once spring has sprung. If you’re on a budget, I would only do more economical choices or bigger special plants in this category and try and get other choices that will survive outside over the winter or will be happy indoors and still be alive when spring comes.

Just a note that to each his own, but I don’t suggest getting the types of cactus that have all the super fine prickles that are impossible to get out of your skin if you plan on moving them around all the time. I usually only get spineless cactus or ones with the more obvious thicker thorns as I don’t mind getting poked by those (at least they don’t disappear into your skin and bother you for days), but you really don’t want to deal with tiny furry prickles and move them around a lot. Ouch.

If you love the look of a tropical or desert landscape but didn’t think you could have that outside where you live, I hope this has given you some ideas for creating your dream plant space! Happy planting! xo. Laura

Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Easy Superhero Cape for Kids!


I’m not sure if she saw it on TV somewhere lately or if we’ve just been watching too much Buzz Lightyear, but either way, Lola’s been wearing a baby blanket around her shoulders and running around the house shouting “SUPER LOLA!” while flying though the air. I love when she uses her imagination and I wanted to foster that kind of play, so I decided that she needed a superhero cape to make her play complete! I searched through my fabric/sewing drawers and found a few things to make a simple cape with and I thought I’d share with you how to make one too!

Supplies:
-1 1/2 yard of fabric for outside
-1 1/2 yard of fabric for inside
stretch glitter ribbon for trim (optional)
glitter fabric sheets for name
-felt fabric sheets for rainbow and stars (or whatever other decoration you want to add)
fabric glue
-sewing machine
-fabric scissors and straight pins
-1″ double fold bias tape (or extra fabric to make your own bias tape)

SIDE NOTE: This cape can be washable or not just depending on what items you choose to decorate the cape with, so if you want it to be washable, just choose all items that can be washed!

You can change the size cape you want pretty easily, but what I did was to lay my outside fabric down on the floor and traced half a pot lid that was about 7″ wide to be the neck of my cape. Then I just measured out 17.5″ away from the curve of the lid to get the curve of my cape and cut that shape out with fabric scissors.


Use that shape as a pattern to cut another layer for the inside of your cape. You can do two of the same color or you can make the inside a different color like I did with the light purple.
Now, before we put our two cape layers together, decide if you want to sew on or glue on your cape decorations. If you want to sew them then you’ll want to sew on your elements to each appropriate side before putting them together. But if you want to glue them on, then you can go ahead and assemble your cape and then glue the design on. I did a combo of both so I sewed on some elements, assembled the cape, and then glued on the rest of the pieces. I just cut out some rainbow arches from some felt sheets as the main decoration for my cape, but you can do whatever shape you want or just keep it simple with stars or their name.
Once I sewed on my felt shapes (I glued them down lightly first to keep them in place while sewing), it was time to assemble the two layers of my cape.
Place your fabric layers right sides together and then pin the cape all the way around with straight pins.
Sew all the way around the edge with a 1/2″ seam allowance and leave a 3″ gap for you to turn your cape right side out through. I would also clip the corners of your cape and make notches all along the neck hole so the fabric will lay flatter once turned out.

Turn your cape through the hole and use an iron to press your seams flat. I would suggest pressing the seams at your neck area first and then ironing the cape outwards from that point to the outer edge so your two layers lie perfectly flat with each other (I just pressed the seams along all the edges without doing that, so I ended up with a little bit of bubbling in the fabric—whoops!).

Topstitch all the way around the edge of your cape with a 1/4″ seam allowance as this will help your cape layers lie flat and will also close up the 3″ gap you left for turning the cape.
If you want to do a decorative trim around the edge, pin it all the way around the edge of the top layer of the cape, avoiding the neck area. Sew your trim on with a corresponding colored thread (I just sewed once around close to the inside edge of the trim and then again close to the outside edge).

Now that my trim was on, I added the rest of my glued elements like Lola’s name in sparkle fabric and some yellow stars for the inside of the cape.

So cute!

Next, to complete the cape, we just need a tie for the neck! If you have 1″ doubled folded bias tape you can use that for the tie, but if you don’t have any on hand (or not in a color you like), you can also make some with extra fabric from your cape’s top layer.

Cut a piece of fabric that’s 4″ x 48″ (or two pieces of fabric that are 4″ x 24″ long if you don’t have a piece that long and sew them together like I did), but you want to cut it on the bias of your fabric (that just means to cut it on an angle so it has more stretch to it). Once it’s cut, you’ll fold the 4″ wide tape down the length of the middle, and use an iron to press it and make a crease so you can see that middle line. Then, you’ll fold both outer edges inward to almost touch that middle line and press it flat all the way down the tape (it should look like the tape does at the top of the picture above). Once you have the folded 2″ wide tape, fold the halves together again and press it so you have a 1″ wide tape with 4 layers of fabric folded inside.

To finish the edges of the bias tape so it doesn’t unravel, unfold just the edge and cut the last 1/2″ at an angle like you see above and fold in and press the last 1/2″ of fabric. Then refold it all back into the 1″ wide tape that it was folded into before and you’ll see that your cut edge is now hidden and tucked up inside the tape.

Pin your bias tape centered around the neck of your cape so the cape is sandwiched in the middle of the tape opening and sew your bias tape all the way around the edges with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Remove the pins and your cape is ready to wear!

Lola was so excited to wear her cape that the glue didn’t quite have time to dry yet, so I had to reattach a few stars once she was done with the first playtime—haha! She mostly loves to yell “to in-fid-did-dy … ah beyoooond!” like Buzz Lightyear and jump off the front porch in the cape, but it makes my heart so happy to see her zooming around the yard in this and see how “official” the cape makes her feel. Hope this project helps to brighten up some days for a little one in your life! xo. Laura

P.S. Lola’s cute little outfit is from June and January, one of my fave places for kid’s clothes!

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Easy Superhero Cape For Kids!

Author Laura Gummerman

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 yard of fabric for outside
  • 1 1/2 yard of fabric for inside
  • 3 yards stretch glitter ribbon for trim (optional)
  • glitter fabric sheets for name
  • felt fabric sheets for rainbow and stars (or whatever other decoration you want to add)
  • fabric glue
  • sewing machine
  • fabric scissors and straight pins
  • 1″ double fold bias tape (or extra fabric to make your own bias tape)

Instructions

  • You can change the size cape you want pretty easily, but what I did was to lay my outside fabric down on the floor and traced half a pot lid that was about 7″ wide to be the neck of my cape. Then I just measured out 17.5″ away from the curve of the lid to get the curve of my cape and cut that shape out with fabric scissors.
  • Use that shape as a pattern to cut another layer for the inside of your cape. You can do two of the same color or you can make the inside a different color like I did with the light purple.
  • Now, before we put our two cape layers together, decide if you want to sew on or glue on your cape decorations. If you want to sew them, then you’ll want to sew on your elements to each appropriate side before putting them together. But if you want to glue them on, then you can go ahead and assemble your cape and then glue the design on. I did a combo of both, so I sewed on some elements, assembled the cape, and then glued on the rest of the pieces. I just cut out some rainbow arches from some felt sheets as the main decoration for my cape, but you can do whatever shape you want or just keep it simple with stars or their name.
  • Once I sewed on my felt shapes (I glued them down lightly first to keep them in place while sewing), it was time to assemble the two layers of my cape.
  • Place your fabric layers right sides together and then pin the cape all the way around with straight pins.
  • Sew all the way around the edge with a 1/2″ seam allowance and leave a 3″ gap for you to turn your cape right side out through. I would also clip the corners of your cape and make notches all along the neck hole so the fabric will lay flatter once turned out.
  • Turn your cape through the hole and use an iron to press your seams flat. I would suggest pressing the seams at your neck area first and then ironing the cape outwards from that point to the outer edge so your two layers lie perfectly flat with each other (I just pressed the seams along all the edges without doing that, so I ended up with a little bit of bubbling in the fabric—whoops!).
  • Topstitch all the way around the edge of your cape with a 1/4″ seam allowance as this will help your cape layers lie flat and will also close up the 3″ gap you left for turning the cape.
  • If you want to do a decorative trim around the edge, pin it all the way around the edge of the top layer of the cape, avoiding the neck area. Sew your trim on with a corresponding colored thread (I just sewed once around close to the inside edge of the trim and then again close to the outside edge).
  • Now that my trim was on, I added the rest of my glued elements like Lola’s name in sparkle fabric and some yellow stars for the inside of the cape.
  • Next, to complete the cape, we just need a tie for the neck! If you have 1″ doubled folded bias tape you can use that for the tie, but if you don’t have any on hand (or not in a color you like) you can also make some with extra fabric from your cape’s top layer.
  • Cut a piece of fabric that’s 4″ x 48″ (or two pieces of fabric that are 4″ x 24″ long if you don’t have a piece that long and sew them together like I did), but you want to cut it on the bias of your fabric (that just means to cut it on an angle so it has more stretch to it). Once it’s cut, you’ll fold the 4″ wide tape down the length of the middle, and use an iron to press it and make a crease so you can see that middle line. Then you’ll fold both outer edges inward to almost touch that middle line and press it flat all the way down the tape (it should look like the tape does at the top of the picture above). Once you have the folded 2″ wide tape, fold the halves together again and press it so you have a 1″ wide tape with 4 layers of fabric folded inside.
  • To finish the edges of the bias tape so it doesn’t unravel, unfold just the edge and cut the last 1/2″ at an angle like you see above and fold in and press the last 1/2″ of fabric. Then refold it all back into the 1″ wide tape that it was folded into before and you’ll see that your cut edge is now hidden and tucked up inside the tape.
  • Pin your bias tape centered around the neck of your cape so the cape is sandwiched in the middle of the tape opening and sew your bias tape all the way around the edges with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Remove the pins and your cape is ready to wear!
Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.