Tiger Nut Horchata (Nut-Free and Dairy-Free!)

OK, OK, I know a lot of you are wondering why this tiger nut recipe is labeled “nut-free,” but surprise—tiger nuts are not actually nuts, despite the name! They are starchy and fibrous root vegetables that taste like a cross between a nut and a sweet potato (at least that was my thought when I first tried them). They are high in fiber, magnesium, and potassium and are a great alternative for flour and milk if you are doing a gluten-free, dairy-free, or nut-free diet. When I was learning more about them initially, I read that tiger nut milk is the base for a Spanish-style horchata (as opposed to the rice milk version that I’m familiar with) and since I love horchata, I knew I had to try making it and it did not disappoint. I’ll show you how I made my version:Tiger Nut Horchata, serves one

For the tiger nut milk (makes about 3 cups of milk):

1 cup tiger nuts (I use this peeled version)
3 cups water (filtered water is best)

For the horchata:

1 cup tiger nut milk
1 teaspoon maple syrup or simple syrup to taste
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

First, you’ll need to make your tiger nut milk. Ideally, you would take your cup of tiger nuts and soak them in enough water to cover them overnight (or up to 24 hours), but I’ve made it a lot where I put them in hot water (freshly boiled) and let them sit 2-3 hours before blending. That’s a quick way to do it if you didn’t remember the night before.

Once your tiger nuts are soaked, rinse the soaking water and add them to a blender with 3 cups of water. Blend on high for several minutes until creamy looking. Spread a thin cotton tea towel or a nut milk bag over a bowl and pour in your mixture to strain out the milk. Keep squeezing until all the liquid has passed through and you have a relatively dry pulp left over.

Side note: You can make tiger nut flour with the leftover pulp by simply spreading it out on a baking sheet and putting it in your oven on the lowest setting for a few hours (or letting it dry on your counter even), stirring it every so often. Once dry, add it to a food processor or blender and blend until it’s a fine powder. Store in an airtight container and now you can use it for baked goods as a flour replacement!

Once your milk is strained, add 1 cup of your milk to a glass and mix in your maple syrup or simple syrup, vanilla extract, and cinnamon. Feel free to add a little more or less of whichever you’d like! Stir together and pour into a glass with a cinnamon stick as a garnish. I wouldn’t keep this in the fridge too long, so make the horchata the same day you want to drink it. But I find the regular tiger nut milk lasts 4 days or so in the fridge (although you’ll want to make sure to shake it occasionally and before drinking, as it tends to settle a bit to the bottom). It’s so good! If you don’t feel like a cold drink, you can also heat this up for a delicious vanilla steamer and it’s a lovely way to wake up or wind down on a cold winter day as well. The milk is super creamy and has a distinct subtle sweetness unlike any other milk I’ve tried, so it’s definitely a treat to try if you haven’t already! xo. Laura

Tiger Nut Horchata

For the tiger nut milk (makes about 3 cups of milk):

  • 1 cup tiger nuts (I use this peeled version)
  • 3 cups water (filtered water is best)

For the horchata:

  • 1 cup tiger nut milk
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup or simple syrup to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  1. First, you’ll need to make your tiger nut milk. Ideally, you would take your cup of tiger nuts and soak them in enough water to cover them overnight (or up to 24 hours), but I’ve made it a lot where I put them in hot water (freshly boiled) and let them sit 2-3 hours before blending. That’s a quick way to do it if you didn’t remember the night before.
  2. Once your tiger nuts are soaked, rinse the soaking water and add them to a blender with 3 cups of water. Blend on high for several minutes until creamy looking. Spread a thin cotton tea towel or a nut milk bag over a bowl and pour in your mixture to strain out the milk. Keep squeezing until all the liquid has passed through and you have a relatively dry pulp left over.
  3. Side note: You can make tiger nut flour with the leftover pulp by simply spreading it out on a baking sheet and putting it in your oven on the lowest setting for a few hours (or letting it dry on your counter even), stirring it every so often. Once dry, add it to a food processor or blender and blend until it’s a fine powder. Store in an airtight container and now you can use it for baked goods as a flour replacement!
  4. Once your milk is strained, add 1 cup of your milk to a glass and mix in your maple syrup or simple syrup, vanilla extract, and cinnamon. Feel free to add a little more or less of whichever you’d like!
  5. Stir together and pour into a glass with a cinnamon stick as a garnish. I wouldn’t keep this in the fridge too long, so make the horchata the same day you want to drink it. But I find the regular tiger nut milk lasts 4 days or so in the fridge (although you’ll want to make sure to shake it occasionally and before drinking as it tends to settle a bit to the bottom).

Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Best At-Home Mojito Recipe

Sipping on a mojito always tastes like I’m on vacation. It’s just one of those drinks that I tend to order when I’m on a beach, and since I live in the middle of the country this only happens on vacation trips. That being said, a mojito is an awesome cocktail to make at home too. It’s simple, refreshing, and is the perfect cocktail to make this weekend as many of us wave goodbye to summer. This is the best at-home mojito recipe and I know you’ll love it as much as I do.

Also, if you happen to have stumbled on this post in the dead of winter, I still think a mojito is a fun cocktail to choose. I’d try sipping this in front of a sunlight lamp or with all the lights on and watching your favorite beach-themed movie. (Can you tell I’m already planning how I’ll cope with the post-holiday winter season this year? Ha.)

Usually mojitos are made with white rum, and this is the kind I usually have on hand at home. It’s good for more flavorful or tiki-style cocktails, not necessarily a good rum just for sipping. And most often a mojito is topped off with club soda, but when I make it at home I like to use a lime-flavored soda water. This brand is from Target but any brand (LaCroix, Bubly, etc.) is great.

In the recipe below you’ll see that muddling the mint leaves is an important step. If you don’t have a muddler, you can use a spoon or even a reusable straw. The goal is to really smash the mint leaves in the mix so they release their oils, as this enhances the flavor as well as the smell.

And major bonus points if you use chipped ice. This really elevates any at-home drink. I will sometimes buy a bag from Sonic and keep it in my freezer, especially if I’m hosting a party and will need extra ice anyway. But any ice is fine, don’t get too hung up on that. 🙂 Cheers! xo. Emma

Best At-Home Mojito

  • 2 1/2 ounces white rum
  • 1 ounce fresh lime juice
  • 1 ounce simple syrup
  • 8 + fresh mint leaves
  • lime flavored club soda
  1. In a cocktail shaker, add the rum, lime juice, simple syrup, and mint leaves. Muddle (smash) the mint leaves well. Add ice and shake the cocktail, then strain into a tall glass such as a Collins or Highball glass. Add ice and top off with the club soda. Garnish with a mint sprig.

  2. You can buy simple syrup or make your own. The simplest way is to combine equal parts water and sugar in a small pot over medium heat. Whisk until the sugar is fully dissolved, and do not allow the mixture to boil. Cool and use as needed, or store in a container in the refrigerator and use for months as needed.

You can use any rum but white rum is traditional. And you can use plain club soda instead of lime flavored, but I think lime flavored is just a little better.

Credits // Author and Photography: Emma Chapman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Easy Cosmo Recipe

I’ve always thought a cosmo was a slightly deceptive cocktail. Hear me out! The first time I ordered one I honestly didn’t know what was in it—I had just heard the name cosmopolitan before, so I thought I’d give it a try. (I’ve actually never seen Sex in the City so I’m not totally sure what show or movie I got this from?) Given that the cocktail is pink, I thought it would be some version of a very sweet martini. Not so! Although a cosmo is sweeter than sipping vodka, it’s not a very sweet drink at all.

But maybe this just shows my own ignorance to the potential complexities of pink drinks. You can’t always judge a book by its cover.

This easy cosmo recipe is quite classic in that it’s a balanced drink (not too sweet, not too bitter) of citron vodka, lime, and cranberry juice. And if you don’t have citron vodka on hand, plain vodka will work as well. I would just be a little heavy handed with the lime juice in that case.

And here’s how I make those little orange spirals. You can buy a fancy peeler to assist with this, but as I have been KonMari-ing my kitchen this year I found I just don’t use that kind of thing enough to have it at home. So I use a potato peeler to scrape off a large piece of orange peel, and then simply use my kitchen shears to cut strips and curl them. This would be too labor intensive to be practical if you were bartending and busy, but if you’re just shaking up a small number of these or have time to make these orange spirals ahead I’d do it because they really do elevate the drink just a little. I mean, THEY ARE CUTE.

🙂

I like to serve these in a martini glass (bonus points if you chill the glass beforehand), but a coupe is really cute too. Whatever you serve this cosmo in, enjoy—cheers! xo. Emma

Easy Cosmo Recipe

  • 2 ounces citron vodka
  • 1 ounce Cointreau
  • 1 ounce cranberry juice
  • 1/2 ounce fresh lime juice
  • orange peel for garnish
  1. In a cocktail shaker, add the vodka, Cointreau, cranberry juice, lime juice, and ice. Shake until the shaker feels very cold in your hands. Strain into a martini glass or coupe and garnish.

You can use plain, unflavored vodka if that’s what you have on hand. I would just go heavy on the lime juice, so maybe use more like 3/4 ounce.

Credits // Author and Photography: Emma Chapman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Watermelon Mint Frosé

OK, I think I just found my favorite summer cocktail ever! Our friend Ellie Schmidly was visiting us this past week and mentioned offhandedly that she recently made a drink with frozen watermelon, rosé, and simple syrup and it was sooo good. I love watermelon and I realized that I had all the ingredients on hand, so I set out to try it myself and the results were literally summer cocktail perfection. It’s so easy and refreshing and I added some chopped up mint to bump up the summer flavors even more!

Watermelon Mint Frosé (serves 2)

2 cups frozen watermelon (cut into 1″ cubes)
1 cup rosé
6 mint leaves, chopped, and extra for garnish
simple syrup to taste

Cut your watermelon into 1″ cubes and freeze in the freezer until frozen. You need 2 cups to make 2 drinks, so freeze some for now and some extra for later—I promise you’ll want another one soon!
Once your watermelon is frozen, add 2 cups to a blender and add in 1 cup of rosé.
Chop up 6 mint leaves and add to the blender (add more if you love mint and less if you don’t). I would finely chop your mint leaves first rather than just add them whole to the blender as you don’t actually blend the drink very much and you want to make sure the mint leaves are chopped and well dispersed.
Pulse your blender until all the ingredients are mixed together. Try not to blend more than you have to so you retain as much slush as you can without blending it into a total smooth juice. You want the slush to look fine and not too chunky. Taste your frosé and add some simple syrup to taste if needed and pulse once or twice quickly to combine the syrup into the frosé. Pour into glasses and garnish with a mint leaf and wedge of watermelon and it’s ready to serve!
If you are wondering—yes, it is as delicious as it looks! Seriously, this is so easy to make and you can keep the watermelon chunks in your freezer for a while and just keep adding more and pulling them out whenever the mood hits you. You’ll use more or less simple syrup based on how sweet your watermelon and rosé are (and based on how much of a sweet tooth you have), so pick a brand of rosé you already like if you have one. Hope this easy summer cocktail makes its way onto your patio table this summer. Cheers! xo. Laura

Watermelon Mint Frosé

  • 2 cups frozen watermelon (cut into 1″ cubes)
  • 1 cup rosé
  • 6 mint leaves (chopped, and extra for garnish)
  • simple syrup to taste
  1. Cut your watermelon into 1″ cubes and freeze in the freezer until frozen. You need 2 cups to make 2 drinks, so freeze some for now and some extra for later—I promise you’ll want another one soon.

  2. Once your watermelon is frozen, add 2 cups to a blender and add in 1 cup of rosé.

  3. Chop up 6 mint leaves and add to the blender (add more if you love mint and less if you don’t). I would finely chop your mint leaves first rather than just add them whole to the blender as you don’t actually blend the drink very much and you want to make sure the mint leaves are chopped and well dispersed.

  4. Pulse your blender until all the ingredients are mixed together. Try not to blend more than you have to so you retain as much slush as you can without blending it into a total smooth juice. You want the slush to look fine and not too chunky. 

    Taste your frosé and add some simple syrup to taste if needed and pulse once or twice quickly to combine the syrup into the frosé. Pour into glasses and garnish with a mint leaf and wedge of watermelon and it’s ready to serve!

Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Non-Dairy White Russian Cocktail


Those who know our family know we are a “Big Lebowski House” around here. That means multiple wall decor items related to The Dude, apparel, mugs, action figures (yes, they have action figures!) and of course, White Russians appear on a semi-regular basis. Since we do more and more plant-based tweaks in our life (and I have a high dairy sensitivity as well), I wanted to find a great dairy-free version of one of our favorite cocktails. So I decided to try it with some cashew cream (since it’s pretty thick and creamy), which makes it a great replacement for the traditional half-and-half in the classic version (and it’s vegan as well!).

Non-Dairy White Russian, serves one

2 ounces vodka
1 ounce coffee liqueur (like Kahlua)
splash of cashew cream* (or other non-dairy milk) to taste

Cashew cream*

1 cup raw cashews (soaked in water overnight, drained, and rinsed)
1 cup water
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 teaspoon of vanilla extract
To make the cashew cream, soak raw cashews overnight, drain and rinse, and add to blender or food processor. Add your water, maple syrup, and vanilla and blend until smooth. A better high-speed blender will blend this until basically totally smooth, but if your blender still leaves it with a bit of fine grain, don’t worry—it will still taste just as good! Store in an airtight container for up to five days.Add your vodka and coffee liqueur over ice (I love to use these large ice cubes for a drink like this) in a short rocks glass.

Add a splash of your cashew cream (or other non-dairy milk) and serve! I like to serve these with a straw or spoon so people can stir the dark and light layers together themselves—it’s fun!

I always looove the light and dark layers in this drink—so pretty. This is a great cocktail option for any time of the year if you (or a party guest you’re having) is avoiding dairy and it’s an easy one to make either with or without dairy by just switching out the cream at the end based on preference. Hey, careful, man, there’s a non-dairy beverage here … xo. Laura

Non-Dairy White Russian Cocktail

  • 2 ounces vodka
  • 1 ounce coffee liqueur (like Kahlua)
  • splash of cashew cream* (or other non-dairy milk to taste)

Cashew cream

  • 1 cup raw cashews (soaked in water overnight, drained, and rinsed)
  • 1 cup water
  • 1 tbsp maple syrup
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  1. To make the cashew cream, soak raw cashews overnight, drain and rinse, and add to blender or food processor. Add your water, maple syrup, and vanilla and blend until smooth. A better high-speed blender will blend this until basically totally smooth, but if your blender still leaves it with a bit of fine grain, don’t worry—it will still taste just as good! Store in an airtight container for up to five days.
  2. Add your vodka and coffee liqueur over ice (I love to use these large ice cubes for a drink like this) in a short rocks glass.
  3. Add a splash of your cashew cream (or other non-dairy milk) and serve! I like to serve these with a straw or spoon so people can stir the dark and light layers together themselves—it’s fun!

Credits// Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Classic Manhattan Cocktail

Classic Manhattan CocktailThe classic Manhattan cocktail was the most famous cocktail shortly after its birth at the Manhattan club in New York City in the 1880s. Over the years, it has fallen in and out of popularity but found its place as a mainstay in most bars during the craft cocktail renaissance. The classic Manhattan cocktail mixes American whiskey, Italian vermouth, with a few dashes of aromatic bitters. It is a timeless and tasty drink—the definition of what a good cocktail should be. It’s spirit forward nature makes it the perfect drink to sip on when the weather starts to get a little cooler.

Classic Manhattan CocktailClassic Manhattan, serves 1

2 ounces rye whiskey
1 ounce sweet vermouth
2 dashes Angostura bitters
luxardo maraschino cherry, for garnish

Classic Manhattan CocktailClassic Manhattan CocktailBuilding this cocktail is super easy. Add all your ingredients to a mixing glass, add ice and stir. To stir like a pro, let your fingers do the work—not your wrist! Your barspoon should be between your index and middle finger. I’m a weirdo and I stir using my pinky and ring finger. Once you get comfortable with the technique, you can do it whatever way is most comfortable for you. I highly encourage personal style when developing your bar techniques. Twirl it around the inside of your mixing glass, using your index finger to pull the spoon toward you and your middle finger to push it away (or whatever fingers you’re using). Stir for about 30-45 seconds then place your strainer over the mixing glass and strain into your serving glass. Garnish with a maraschino cherry. These are my absolute favorite cherries to use in cocktails.

Classic Manhattan CocktailClassic Manhattan CocktailClassic Manhattan CocktailClassic Manhattan CocktailThe classic Manhattan cocktail is strong, sweet, aromatic, and slightly spicy from the rye whiskey. Some people prefer to make their Manhattans with bourbon instead, which is perfectly acceptable. Historically it is made with rye whiskey and I tend to like this variation more because it dries it out a little and has a spicier, edgier profile. Using bourbon will make a sweeter and mellower drink, but still beautiful and totally delicious nonetheless! So please mix whatever your heart pleases! Will you be trying a classic Manhattan cocktail this fall? Let us know in the comments below. Happy fall, everyone! xo Natalie

Classic Manhattan Cocktail

  • 2 ounces rye whiskey
  • 1 ounce sweet vermouth
  • 2 dashes Angostura bitters
  • Luxardo maraschino cherry (for garnish)
  1. Add all your ingredients to a mixing glass, add ice and stir.
  2. Stir for about 30-45 seconds then place your strainer over the mixing glass and strain into your serving glass. Garnish with a maraschino cherry.

Credits//Author and Photography: Natalie Jacob. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.