Tiger Nut Horchata (Nut-Free and Dairy-Free!)

OK, OK, I know a lot of you are wondering why this tiger nut recipe is labeled “nut-free,” but surprise—tiger nuts are not actually nuts, despite the name! They are starchy and fibrous root vegetables that taste like a cross between a nut and a sweet potato (at least that was my thought when I first tried them). They are high in fiber, magnesium, and potassium and are a great alternative for flour and milk if you are doing a gluten-free, dairy-free, or nut-free diet. When I was learning more about them initially, I read that tiger nut milk is the base for a Spanish-style horchata (as opposed to the rice milk version that I’m familiar with) and since I love horchata, I knew I had to try making it and it did not disappoint. I’ll show you how I made my version:Tiger Nut Horchata, serves one

For the tiger nut milk (makes about 3 cups of milk):

1 cup tiger nuts (I use this peeled version)
3 cups water (filtered water is best)

For the horchata:

1 cup tiger nut milk
1 teaspoon maple syrup or simple syrup to taste
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 teaspoon cinnamon

First, you’ll need to make your tiger nut milk. Ideally, you would take your cup of tiger nuts and soak them in enough water to cover them overnight (or up to 24 hours), but I’ve made it a lot where I put them in hot water (freshly boiled) and let them sit 2-3 hours before blending. That’s a quick way to do it if you didn’t remember the night before.

Once your tiger nuts are soaked, rinse the soaking water and add them to a blender with 3 cups of water. Blend on high for several minutes until creamy looking. Spread a thin cotton tea towel or a nut milk bag over a bowl and pour in your mixture to strain out the milk. Keep squeezing until all the liquid has passed through and you have a relatively dry pulp left over.

Side note: You can make tiger nut flour with the leftover pulp by simply spreading it out on a baking sheet and putting it in your oven on the lowest setting for a few hours (or letting it dry on your counter even), stirring it every so often. Once dry, add it to a food processor or blender and blend until it’s a fine powder. Store in an airtight container and now you can use it for baked goods as a flour replacement!

Once your milk is strained, add 1 cup of your milk to a glass and mix in your maple syrup or simple syrup, vanilla extract, and cinnamon. Feel free to add a little more or less of whichever you’d like! Stir together and pour into a glass with a cinnamon stick as a garnish. I wouldn’t keep this in the fridge too long, so make the horchata the same day you want to drink it. But I find the regular tiger nut milk lasts 4 days or so in the fridge (although you’ll want to make sure to shake it occasionally and before drinking, as it tends to settle a bit to the bottom). It’s so good! If you don’t feel like a cold drink, you can also heat this up for a delicious vanilla steamer and it’s a lovely way to wake up or wind down on a cold winter day as well. The milk is super creamy and has a distinct subtle sweetness unlike any other milk I’ve tried, so it’s definitely a treat to try if you haven’t already! xo. Laura

Tiger Nut Horchata

For the tiger nut milk (makes about 3 cups of milk):

  • 1 cup tiger nuts (I use this peeled version)
  • 3 cups water (filtered water is best)

For the horchata:

  • 1 cup tiger nut milk
  • 1 teaspoon maple syrup or simple syrup to taste
  • 1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 teaspoon cinnamon
  1. First, you’ll need to make your tiger nut milk. Ideally, you would take your cup of tiger nuts and soak them in enough water to cover them overnight (or up to 24 hours), but I’ve made it a lot where I put them in hot water (freshly boiled) and let them sit 2-3 hours before blending. That’s a quick way to do it if you didn’t remember the night before.
  2. Once your tiger nuts are soaked, rinse the soaking water and add them to a blender with 3 cups of water. Blend on high for several minutes until creamy looking. Spread a thin cotton tea towel or a nut milk bag over a bowl and pour in your mixture to strain out the milk. Keep squeezing until all the liquid has passed through and you have a relatively dry pulp left over.
  3. Side note: You can make tiger nut flour with the leftover pulp by simply spreading it out on a baking sheet and putting it in your oven on the lowest setting for a few hours (or letting it dry on your counter even), stirring it every so often. Once dry, add it to a food processor or blender and blend until it’s a fine powder. Store in an airtight container and now you can use it for baked goods as a flour replacement!
  4. Once your milk is strained, add 1 cup of your milk to a glass and mix in your maple syrup or simple syrup, vanilla extract, and cinnamon. Feel free to add a little more or less of whichever you’d like!
  5. Stir together and pour into a glass with a cinnamon stick as a garnish. I wouldn’t keep this in the fridge too long, so make the horchata the same day you want to drink it. But I find the regular tiger nut milk lasts 4 days or so in the fridge (although you’ll want to make sure to shake it occasionally and before drinking as it tends to settle a bit to the bottom).

Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Easy Orange Creamsicle Gummy Bears!


Have you ever made homemade gummies? While I’ve made my fair share of jello shots, gummies without alcohol isn’t really something I’ve tried in the past. But now that we have a toddler in the house, I’ve been making them a lot this past year and it’s so easy to do! These are great to pack in a lunch bag, have a handful for a snack at home, or use as a toddler incentive when you’re trying to get them to do something (hahaha). You can switch out flavors pretty easily with different juices, but right now this orange creamsicle is my favorite! I made the gummies in two layers because it’s extra pretty, but you can also save some time and make them in one layer as well …
Orange Creamsicle Gummy Bears (makes about 40 with this mold)

For orange layer:

2/3 cup orange juice
1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (you can add more or less to taste)
2 tablespoons gelatin

For cream layer:

1/3 cup milk of choice
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1 tablespoon gelatin


Reserve about 1/4 of the orange juice in a cup, add your gelatin and give it a stir. Allow the gelatin to bloom in the cup so that the liquid solidifies (should take less than 5 minutes). Add the remainder of your juice to a small saucepan and heat on medium until hot but not boiling. Once your saucepan of juice is hot, add the bloomed gelatin to the pot and stir until the gelatin dissolves.
Mix in your honey or maple syrup and use a candy dropper to fill your bear molds about 2/3 of the way full (the molds I bought come with a candy dropper which was super helpful). Allow the molds to set a bit in the fridge for 15-20 minutes. While that layer is setting, repeat the process of adding most of your milk to a sauce pan, but reserve a few tablespoons of the milk to mix with your gelatin and allow it to bloom and solidify. Add the gelatin to the milk once it is hot and stir until dissolved. Add in your vanilla extract and stir.Once your gummies have partially set in the fridge, fill each mold to the top with your cream layer and place back in the fridge for another 2 hours to fully set.Once your bears are set, simply pop them out of the mold and they are ready to eat!
Store bears in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two weeks. I add these to Lola’s lunchbox all the time, but I probably wouldn’t take them to the beach or someplace where they will be sitting in hot conditions for a long time—they may start to melt a bit!
How fun are those?! You can make lots of flavors of gummies and all you really have to know is how much gelatin to use per cup of liquid (most of them are about 3 tablespoons of gelatin to 1 cup of liquid), and you can sub whatever kinds of juices/pureed fruits you want! You can also make gummies with agar agar for a vegan option, but you may need to play around with the amount to use as it’s a little trickier to get the right ratio with acidic foods like citrus or strawberries (and it may not work as well for intricately shaped molds). Don’t be fooled, just because these are in the shape of a bear and you can see that little toddler hand reaching for them, this mommy gets in her fair share when Lola isn’t looking … yum! xo. Laura

Orange Creamsicle Gummy Bears

For the orange layer:

  • 2/3 cup orange juice
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup or honey (you can add more or less to taste)
  • 2 tablespoons gelatin

For the cream layer:

  • 1/3 cup milk of choice
  • 1 tsp vanilla extract
  • 1 tbsp gelatin
  1. Reserve about 1/4 of the orange juice in a cup, add your gelatin and give it a stir. Allow the gelatin to bloom in the cup so that the liquid solidifies (should take less than 5 minutes). Add the remainder of your juice to a small saucepan and heat on medium until hot but not boiling. Once your saucepan of juice is hot, add the bloomed gelatin to the pot and stir until the gelatin dissolves.
  2. Mix in your honey or maple syrup and use a candy dropper to fill your bear molds about 2/3 of the way full (the molds I bought come with a candy dropper which was super helpful). Allow the molds to set a bit in the fridge for 15-20 minutes. 
  3. While that layer is setting, repeat the process of adding most of your milk to a sauce pan but reserve a few tablespoons of the milk to mix with your gelatin and allow it to bloom and solidify. Add the gelatin to the milk once it is hot and stir until dissolved. Add in your vanilla extract and stir.
  4. Once your gummies have partially set in the fridge, fill each mold to the top with your cream layer and place back in the fridge for another 2 hours to fully set.
  5. Once your bears are set, simply pop them out of the mold and they are ready to eat!
  6. Store bears in an airtight container in the fridge for up to two weeks. I add these to Lola’s lunchbox all the time but I probably wouldn’t take them to the beach or someplace where they will be sitting in hot conditions for a long time—they may start to melt a bit!

Credits // Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Instant Pot Non-Dairy Yogurt (Cashew + Coconut Options)

For those of you who also make a lot of non-dairy choices, I feel like yogurt can be a tricky one. It’s so expensive to buy non-dairy yogurts, almost impossible to find ones without added refined sugar, and to be honest, I just don’t like the taste of most of them. So for a while I just gave up on yogurt altogether. It wasn’t until I got my instant pot that I decided it would be worth a try to make my own and so I’m glad I did! It’s not that hard at all and you can make a small or big batch depending on how much you go through, and you can use different kinds of non-dairy milk to suit your needs. I have an almond sensitivity, so I make coconut and cashew yogurt. I’ll show you how I make those!

For the coconut yogurt:

1 can of full-fat coconut milk (or coconut cream works too, try both and see which consistency you like better, although some coconut creams react oddly with the water and separates from it, which you don’t want)
1/2 cup water
2 teaspoons gelatin
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 probiotic capsule (I use this one)

Blend the can of coconut milk and water in a blender until smooth. Add the mixture to your instant pot and set to “boil” to heat up the mixture (my yogurt setting has a boil option if you press the yogurt button a few times, but yours may be different). Once it has boiled and the machine tells you it’s done, check the temperature and make sure it’s hit 180° (if it hasn’t you can run another “boil” cycle to heat it up more). Sprinkle in the gelatin while whisking vigorously so there are no clumps and allow the mixture to cool to about 105°. Using a digital instant read thermometer is by far the easiest way to check temps and you can use it for lots of other recipes too. You can wait 30 minutes or so for it to cool down in the instant pot chamber or you can remove the pot and place it on the counter or in some cool water to speed up the process.

Once 105° is reached, mix in the maple syrup and sprinkle the insides of the probiotic capsule (pull apart the two capsule halves) while whisking to combine. Let yogurt cook on the “yogurt” setting for 12-16 hours (some do up to 24 hours if they want tangier yogurt) and then remove the instant pot lid. The coconut yogurt will still look super watery with a thin white layer on top, so don’t think you’ve failed yet! It needs to set up in the fridge, so give it a whisk to combine again and pour it into a container to finish in the fridge for a few hours. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. Once the yogurt has set, it’s ready to eat!

*Note: Since you are dealing with an item that’s going to ferment, make sure all your utensils, bowls, measuring spoons, etc., are clean and sterilized before use (you can rinse them with boiled water to sterilize).

For the cashew yogurt:

1 cup raw cashews (soak overnight or for 30 minutes in hot water)
2 cups filtered water
1 1/2 teaspoon gelatin
1 tablespoon maple syrup
1 probiotic capsule (I use this one)

Soak your cashews either overnight in water or for 30 minutes in hot water before making. Rinse the cashews twice in fresh water and add to blender with the filtered water. Blend for several minutes on high until smooth.

Add the mixture to your instant pot and set to “boil” to heat up the mixture (my yogurt setting has a boil option if you press the yogurt button a few times). Once the mixture has boiled and your machine beeps to signal it’s done, check the temperature to see if it’s up to 180° and sprinkle in the gelatin while whisking vigorously so there are no clumps. Allow the mixture to cool to about 105°, and, while whisking, add in the probiotic capsule (open up the two halves and sprinkle it in) and the maple syrup. Cook on the yogurt setting for 12-16 hours (the longer you cook it, the tangier it will be). The mixture will set up more in the fridge, so add it to an airtight container and place in the refrigerator. This recipe gives me a thick Greek-style yogurt which I love, but if that’s too thick for you, you can also add more water at the beginning to end up with a thinner yogurt or do a little less gelatin. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.

*Note: Since you are dealing with an item that’s going to ferment, make sure all your utensils, bowls, measuring spoons, etc., are clean and sterilized before use (you can rinse them with boiled water to sterilize).

As a side note, I see that a lot of people use about 1/4 cup of already made yogurt in place of the probiotic capsule to get the bacteria going, so that’s an option too. But I just haven’t tried it that way yet—it’s usually gone to where I don’t have any left to add back in! Also, I’ve seen recipes where people do pretty much the same thing but omit the gelatin if they want to make it vegan or add some agar agar instead. I haven’t tried that either, but I would try adding the same amount of agar agar as gelatin the first time you make it and then add more or less the next time if you want different results. You can also double the yogurt recipes above (or triple too, probably) if you want to make more at one time. My favorite way to top these yogurts is with some fruit, granola, and a little bit of honey or maple syrup! Yum! xo. Laura

Instant Pot Non-Dairy Yogurt

For the coconut yogurt:

  • 1 can of full-fat coconut milk (or coconut cream works too, try both and see which consistency you like better although some coconut creams react oddly with the water and separates from it, which you don’t want)
  • 1/2 cup water
  • 2 teaspoons gelatin
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 probiotic capsule

For the cashew yogurt:

  • 1 cup raw cashews (soak overnight or for 30 minutes in hot water)
  • 2 cups filtered water
  • 1 1/2 teaspoon gelatin
  • 1 tablespoon maple syrup
  • 1 probiotic capsule
  1. Blend the can of coconut milk and water in a blender until smooth. Add the mixture to your instant pot and set to “boil” to heat up the mixture (my yogurt setting has a boil option if you press the yogurt button a few times, but yours may be different). Once it has boiled and the machine tells you it’s done, check the temperature and make sure it’s hit 180° (if it hasn’t you can run another “boil” cycle to heat it up more).
  2. Sprinkle in the gelatin while whisking vigorously so there are no clumps and allow the mixture to cool to about 105°. Using a digital instant read thermometer is by far the easiest way to check temps and you can use it for lots of other recipes too. You can wait 30 minutes or so for it to cool down in the instant pot chamber or you can remove the pot and place it on the counter or in some cool water to speed up the process.
  3. Once 105° is reached, mix in the maple syrup and sprinkle the insides of the probiotic capsule (pull apart the two capsule halves) while whisking to combine. Let yogurt cook on the “yogurt” setting for 12-16 hours (some do up to 24 hours if they want tangier yogurt) and then remove the instant pot lid.
  4. The coconut yogurt will still look super watery with a thin white layer on top, so don’t think you’ve failed yet! It needs to set up in the fridge, so give it a whisk to combine again and pour it into a container to finish in the fridge for a few hours. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week. Once the yogurt has set, it’s ready to eat!
  5. *Note: Since you are dealing with an item that’s going to ferment, make sure all your utensils, bowls, measuring spoons, etc., are clean and sterilized before use (you can rinse them with boiled water to sterilize).

For the cashew yogurt:

  1. Soak your cashews either overnight in water or for 30 minutes in hot water before making. Rinse the cashews twice in fresh water and add to blender with the filtered water. Blend for several minutes on high until smooth.
  2. Add the mixture to your instant pot and set to “boil” to heat up the mixture (my yogurt setting has a boil option if you press the yogurt button a few times). Once the mixture has boiled and your machine beeps to signal it’s done, check the temperature to see if it’s up to 180° and sprinkle in the gelatin while whisking vigorously so there are no clumps. Allow the mixture to cool to about 105°, and, while whisking, add in the probiotic capsule (open up the two halves and sprinkle it in) and the maple syrup.
  3. Cook on the yogurt setting for 12-16 hours (the longer you cook it, the tangier it will be). The mixture will set up more in the fridge, so add it to an airtight container and place in refrigerator. This recipe gives me a thick Greek-style yogurt which I love, but if that’s too thick for you you can also add more water at the beginning to end up with a thinner yogurt or do a little less gelatin. Store in an airtight container in the fridge for up to a week.
  4. *Note: Since you are dealing with an item that’s going to ferment, make sure all your utensils, bowls, measuring spoons, etc., are clean and sterilized before use (you can rinse them with boiled water to sterilize).

Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Easy Grain-Free Granola (Paleo and Gluten-Free!)

I love granola. I’ve made my own granola a lot over the past few years (we’ve got several granola recipes we love), but I wanted something a little different lately, so I’ve been making this grain-free granola instead! I love having it as cereal every morning or sprinkling some over yogurt with berries on top—it’s so good and super easy to make!

Easy Grain-Free Granola (makes about 4 cups)

1 cup raw unsalted cashews
1 cup raw pecans
1/2 cup raw pumpkin seeds
1/2 cup flaked coconut
1/4 cup raw sunflower seeds
1 teaspoon vanilla extract
1/4 cup coconut oil
1/4 cup maple syrup (can use honey also)
3/4 teaspoon sea salt
1/4 cup cacao nibs (or you could add small chocolate chips once totally cooled)
1/3 cup dried cranberries

Put your cashews, pecans, pumpkin seeds, and coconut into a blender or food processor and pulse until the mixture becomes medium grain crumbles. You don’t want to pulverize it to become a nut flour, but if you still see whole chunks of nuts, give it a stir and pulse until everything is very coarsely crumbled. Pour into medium-sized mixing bowl.

Warm your coconut oil, syrup, and vanilla extract in a small saucepan and stir once all melted together.

Pour your syrup on top of your nut mixture and stir to combine. Add your salt and sunflower seeds and stir again. I find that the granola usually tastes a little too sweet before it’s baked, but then it’s at the perfect level out of the oven so feel free to add less sweetener (and a little more coconut oil instead) if you prefer.

Spread out your granola onto a baking sheet and bake at 300° for 20 minutes, stirring it at the 10-minute mark. Once you take the granola out, stir in your cacao nibs and cranberries and let cool on the pan (it will crisp up more as it cools). Once totally cool, break it into crumbles and store in an airtight container.

Of course you can switch out some nuts and seeds for other varieties that you prefer, but this is my fave combination so far. This is delicious with just milk on top for cereal and great for topping yogurt, chia seed puddings, or any other thing you might normally put granola on. I think this would probably last up to two weeks when stored, but I’ve never had it around that long to find out! It’s usually gone in under a week every time … it’s so good! xo. Laura

Easy Grain-Free Granola

  • 1 cup raw unsalted cashews
  • 1 cup raw pecans
  • 1/2 cup raw pumpkin seeds
  • 1/2 cup flaked coconut
  • 1/4 cup raw sunflower seeds
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • 1/4 cup coconut oil
  • 1/4 cup maple syrup (can use honey also)
  • 3/4 teaspoon sea salt
  • 1/4 cup cacao nibs (or you could add small chocolate chips once totally cooled)
  • 1/3 cup dried cranberries
  1. Put your cashews, pecans, pumpkin seeds, and coconut into a blender or food processor and pulse until the mixture becomes medium grain crumbles.
  2. You don’t want to pulverize it to become a nut flour, but if you still see whole chunks of nuts, give it a stir and pulse until everything is very coarsely crumbled. Pour into medium-sized mixing bowl.
  3. Warm your coconut oil, syrup, and vanilla extract in a small saucepan and stir once all melted together.
  4. Pour your syrup on top of your nut mixture and stir to combine. Add your salt and sunflower seeds and stir again. I find that the granola usually tastes a little too sweet before it’s baked, but then it’s at the perfect level out of the oven so feel free to add less sweetener (and a little more coconut oil instead) if you prefer.
  5. Spread out your granola onto a baking sheet and bake at 300° for 20 minutes, stirring it at the 10-minute mark. Once you take the granola out, stir in your cacao nibs and cranberries and let cool on the pan (it will crisp up more as it cools). Once totally cool, break it into crumbles and store in an airtight container.

Credits // Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

25 Soup And Salad Favorites

It’s soup season. And salad season. OK … it’s soup AND salad season. There’s nothing better than a warm, comforting bowl of soup during the winter months. The recipes in this roundup are healthy, too. You can use all kinds of ingredient substitutions depending on your diet, like non-dairy milk instead of whole milk, nutritional yeast in place of cheese, and bone broth instead of vegetable stock for added protein. There are so many options in the soup world! And, if you’re feeling anything like I am after eating loads of treats over the holidays, a green salad (with homemade dressing and lots of veggies) sounds absolutely perfect. Ready for a list of recipes?

Soups

First on our list is roasted red pepper tomato soup. An upgrade from classic tomato soup, if you will. Add some toasted bread or a side of grilled cheese (yes, please!). If you love red peppers, you have to try this version made with meatballs.

Dairy-free broccoli cheese soup. This is one of my favorites because it’s delicious, healthy and filling.

This soup is the perfect mix of veggies and carbs. Mmmm … gnocchi.

One of my favorite soups of ALL TIME (did I mention I’m a soup fanatic?) is Emma’s cauliflower and leek soup. Cauliflower is filled with protein and the potatoes make the soup extra creamy (especially if you use red potatoes). Pro tip. 🙂

You are probably wondering if there’s going to be a spicy soup on our list. This carrot soup is made with chipotle peppers and is dairy-free, but you would never know because it’s so good and still manages to be creamy.

The easiest black bean soup recipe that you’ll want to eat for lunch AND dinner.

Is curry considered a soup? This 20-minute vegetable green curry is one of our most popular recipes on the blog, so it’s part of the list!

This tomato soup (that can be whipped up in 10 minutes) is another one of my favorites. Emma used blended cashews instead of milk to make this soup nice and rich. Not what you expected to hear? It’s incredible, trust me.

Miso soup isn’t necessarily filling enough to eat as a meal, but this version, made with edamame and wild rice, definitely is.

White bean, dill, and vegetable soup. The ultimate comforting, feel-good soup, is another name for it.

Put all the ingredients from this split pea and lentil soup recipe in a slow cooker before work and you’ll have dinner by the time you get home.

First of all, soup in a mug is the best thing ever. And the flavors in this recipe are amazing—acorn squash topped with roasted chickpeas. Mmm.

Salads

Let’s talk about salad. While a classic caesar or chef salad can be insanely good, this list focuses more on unique flavors and toppings, like kale salad (pictured above) with fresh lemons, sliced almonds, and the best homemade poppyseed dressing.

Falafel is really tasty by itself, but have you ever topped a salad with it? Game changer.

This autumn bliss salad is filled with all kinds of good-for-you ingredients like pumpkin seeds, apples, and dried cranberries. And it’s topped with stuffing croutons. That’s right—stuffing.

OK, so this one doesn’t technically contain any greens (minus the basil leaves), but OMG there’s nothing like a fresh strawberry caprese salad.

If you don’t know by now, kale is one of my favorite salad choices (and spinach is the runner-up). I guarantee this creamy apple + kale salad will be one of your go-to’s after you try it. Here’s another kale option made with apples, avocado, pecans, and more. It was a huge hit at Friendsgiving a few years ago.

If you love fresh spring rolls with peanut sauce, here’s a salad version for you (!!!!).I love the addition of fresh grapefruit in this recipe. And quinoa!

A filling cobb salad is a great weeknight dinner option. This one is topped with Facon (veggie bacon) but you could totally add the real thing instead.

Brussels sprouts are the bomb (I hope you agree) and combining them with homemade dressing and croutons to make a warm salad is … incredible.

Make a batch of blood orange vinaigrette to add to your favorite green salad.

This salad is packed with healthy ingredients and soft boiled eggs for extra protein, and it’s one of Emma’s go-to lunches during the week.

Cheers to healthy recipes that make you feel good! And ice cream, too. xo -Jacki

Wild Rice and Mushroom Risotto Soup

What do we want? SOUP! When do we want it? ALL WINTER!

Just imagine me doing this call and response to myself at my house for the next few months. It’s basically my anthem. Most of the day you can find me either drinking hot tea or eating some kind of hot soup. I am considering it self care this time of year when the weather is frigid and I regret loving houses with high ceilings (draft city!).

If you’re soup obsessed like me, this is a good one. This wild rice and mushroom risotto soup is vegetable based with some whole grains thrown in as well. It’s brothy but still manages to be creamy and super filling. If you want to throw some shredded chicken or sautéed shrimp in there, I wouldn’t blame you. This is simply the soup version of one of my favorite things to make at home—risotto.

This wild rice and mushroom risotto soup is made of mostly simple, whole ingredients. I do add some dairy (but see the recipe notes below for possible changes/omissions if you need) and there is wine in this soup. I love the slight yeasty taste that cooking with wine adds to dishes. Plus major bonus points if you have already opened a bottle of wine to make this soup. Well, you might as well have a glass too. 🙂

You could absolutely change up some of the vegetables in this soup in case you have other veggies you need to use up. Soup is always an excellent way to use up leftover vegetables. Enjoy and stay warm, friends! xo. Emma

Wild Rice and Mushroom Risotto Soup

  • 1 tablespoon butter
  • 2 tablespoons olive oil
  • 2 small shallots
  • 1 orange or red bell pepper
  • 3-4 cloves of garlic
  • 1-2 large portobello mushroom caps
  • 1 cup wild rice
  • 2 bay leaves
  • 4 cups vegetable or chicken stock
  • 1 cup white wine
  • 2 teaspoons cornstarch
  • 2 tablespoons whole milk or cream
  • 1/2 cup Parmesan cheese
  • 2-3 tablespoons chopped herbs like chives and parsley
  • salt and pepper
  1. Chop the shallots, bell pepper, and mushrooms into small pieces. Mince the garlic. In a large pot over medium to high heat, melt the butter and olive oil together and lightly season with salt and pepper. Add the shallots and bell pepper and cook for 2-3 minutes until beginning to soften. Stir in the mushrooms and garlic and cook another minute.
  2. Then stir in the rice and cook for another 2-3 minutes. Add the wine and continue to cook uncovered on high heat for another 2 minutes. Then add the stock and bay leaves. Turn the heat down to low, cover and allow to cook for 45-50 minutes until rice is tender. Stir occasionally.
  3. Uncover, remove the bay leaves, and allow to cook for another 5-6 minutes so the soup reduces just a little. During this time, in a small bowl whisk together the cornstarch and milk. Stir this into the soup and allow to thicken. Just before serving, stir in the Parmesan cheese and herbs and season with a little more salt and pepper as needed.

You can substitute the butter for more oil, the milk for a non-dairy milk, and simply skip the Parmesan or use a non-dairy alternative if you want to avoid dairy. I like to use a white wine in this, usually a chardonnay.

Credits // Author and Photography: Emma Chapman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.