Incredible Offer Gives Australians The Chance To Make Their Mid Year Fashion Dreams Come True

[vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image="262561" img_size="full" alignment="center"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/6"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator][vc_column_text]This feature has been produced in partnership with Klarna

Klarna, Australia's new shopping app and online payment disruptor, is looking to spread some cheer. The innovative buy now, pay later provider and shopping app has already brought smiles to the faces of many Aussies; but their latest promotion, 'Klarna Kristmas in July', is sure to help the nation get into a truly festive spirit this month.

Starting today, Klarna is holding 12 BIG days of giveaways on their Instagram account, @klarna.au. Each day, they will pick winners from their stories, offering up prizes and gift vouchers from some of Australia's most popular Klarna retailers, including ASOS, Kogan, Roses Only and more.

Some highlights among the daily prizes include a crisp cycling jersey from Attaquer, a $100 voucher for Appliances Online that will go a long way towards buying that coffee maker you've always wanted, and a pair of luxe Mayberry slides from Emu Australia that will have you looking like Gianluca Vacchi.[/vc_column_text][vc_separator][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/6"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column][vc_single_image image="262562" img_size="full" add_caption="yes" alignment="center"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/6"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator][vc_column_text]Normally Christmas in July is just a good excuse to go on a pub crawl with your mates in a quirky jumper, but getting the chance to win some swag is a far better use of the occasion. Nothing warms the soul more than a bit of retail therapy.

There will be a different prize each day during Klarna's promotion – so that's 12 chances to win. One lucky winner will score the grand prize, which is every single daily prize rolled into one.

To be in with a chance to win some epic products from Klarna's Santa sack, you need to make sure you’re following Klarna Australia on Instagram.

May the Kristmas Spirit be with you.[/vc_column_text][/vc_column][vc_column width="1/6"][/vc_column][/vc_row][vc_row][vc_column width="1/6"][/vc_column][vc_column width="2/3"][vc_separator][vc_column_text]

Check out the Klarna app for more information.

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Roger Federer’s New Sneaker Deal Reveals Why Top Athletes Are Leaving Big Brands

Celebrity endorsements are incredibly important for apparel brands, with sportspeople in particular paid bucketloads to wear their clothes.

Nike and Adidas are inarguably the big dogs of the sportswear world and drop serious cash to help keep them on top of the pile: Nike has spent billions keeping LeBron James and Cristiano Ronaldo in their fold, whilst Adidas has found success with names like Lionel Messi, Ellyse Perry and Angelique Kerber. Signature sneaker models like the Nike Air Jordan and Adidas Stan Smith have transcended their sporting origins and become genuine fashion icons, too.

Getting an endorsement from either Herzogenaurach or Beaverton used to be a dream for athletes, but in 2020 more and more sportsmen and women are eschewing the big two in favour of deals with smaller players – with Switzerland's greatest export since the Omega Speedmaster leading the charge.

Swiss tennis legend Roger Federer's latest partnership with rising sportswear brand On has been a huge paradigm shift for athlete endorsements. Federer's deal with the Swiss brand is more than just your usual endorsement, too – Federer has invested an undisclosed sum into the company and appears to be taking a fairly active role in the business beyond just advertising.

On has quickly gained a cult following among runners for the quality of their sneakers, but On's latest exploit is a signature model for Federer. As opposed to a tennis court-focused shoe or the high-performance runners the brand has built its reputation on, "The Roger" is a classic white sneaker especially designed for casual comfort that's been given a special limited release. It's an adroit marketing tactic for the brand; one that's been used by the big players before to drum up hype: artificial scarcity + celebrity endorsement + novel technology = shoes selling like hotcakes.

 

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A post shared by On (@on_running) on

Getting Federer on board was a masterstroke for On. Not only does he have a strong personal brand underpinned by immense skill, integrity and likeableness, but as an investor as well as an endorser, he'll work hard to ensure the brand continues to succeed.

The advantage that a small brand like On has over the big traditional players (Nike, Adidas, New Balance, Reebok, Lacoste etc.) is that they can devote more time and care to their athletes. When Federer was with Nike, he shared the spotlight with other tennis players like Serena Williams, Rafael Nadal, Simona Halep and Nick Kyrgios. Now, he can demand On's undivided attention.

Other athletes have also explored alternative sponsors for collaboration. British tennis great Andy Murray recently inked a deal with British clothing brand Castore, and NBA superstar Steph Curry's deal with Under Armour has done wonders for both him and the UA brand.

It has also forced the more established sportswear brands to up their game in regards to what they can offer athletes. Without trying to come off too libertarian, this sort of healthy free-market competition will ultimately improve the technologies that underpin modern sportswear and lead to a better product for both athletes and consumers.

Game, set, match.

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Influencer’s ‘Outrageous’ Disrespect For Rare $20,000 Sneakers Sends Hypebeasts Into Meltdown

Nike's forthcoming collaboration with storied French grand couturier Christian Dior has been one of the most hyped fashion drops of 2020, and perhaps of recent memory: combining Dior's impeccable materials and handcrafted luxury with the iconic design of the Air Jordan I was a masterstroke for the two style icons.

Unfortunately, huge hype attracts huge flogs. Enter: good time lover, controversial influencer and YouTuber Jake Paul, who posted a video with his Dior x Nike Air Jordans that has sneakerheads fuming.

Paul shared a clip on his Instagram of him eating cereal out of his $20,000 pair of 'Air Diors'. To add insult to injury, the cereal's a limited edition box of Reese's Puffs produced in collaboration with rapper Travis Scott, the hyped cereal selling for upwards of $50 on the aftermarket.

 

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So the new $20,000 Dior X Air Jordan 👟 taste good right? 🎥 @Jakepaul 👀 👀

A post shared by Rich Kids Of The Internet (@rkoi) on

The move did not go down well online. From "no money can buy class" to "you should grow up," many followers of RKOI's Instagram page (where the video was reposted) were up in arms, making their feelings known in the comments.

"Who gives a shit how much they cost, it’s fucking stupid to eat outta sneakers."

Disrespecting a brand-new shoe like this in such an egregious way is outrageous enough, but to do it to such rare sneakers is particularly offensive.

Dior's only made 8,500 pairs of these sneakers, making this a particularly limited release. On top of that, the Air Dior capsule's release has been delayed by COVID-19, raising the rarity of the sneakers already on the market.

Paul and his brother Logan have made careers out of being controversial. After both growing to notoriety on the now-defunct social media app Vine, they've since branched out to film, TV and even boxing. While both have legions of young online fans, both have reputations for flirting – too far – with controversy, relying on that to get attention rather than truly creative ideas.

Most notoriously, Logan posted footage on YouTube of a suicide victim's corpse during a trip he made to Japan, and Jake was recently (allegedly) filmed looting during the 2020 LA riots (despite having a net worth of over $11 million).

How did Paul get his hands on a pair of these sneakers, then? In a classic luxury fashion marketing move, celebrities and influencers have been drip-fed Air Dior sneakers ahead of the mainstream release in order to build up hype. Either Paul got special access, or he dropped bulk cash on them (or both, most likely) – making this mistreatment of the sneakers even more painful for sneaker fans.

DMARGE spoke exclusively to stock expert and sneakerhead Adrian Monardo, Customer Success Manager at Stake, to explore what this clip reveals about sneaker culture.

"It’s not surprising to see young influencers take part in stunts like this.," Monardo relates.
"Jake gets a lot of clout and publicity by defacing one of the most exclusive and hyped sneakers out right now."

While Paul's nonchalance has got sneakerheads fuming, it's unlikely to change the demand for the collaboration.

"Given how sought after the shoe is, with resale prices in the 5 digit range, it's hard to suggest that Jake Paul alone has the power to move the price of the sneaker.  Like stocks, the resale price of the sneaker is the equilibrium of supply and demand for it. Sure, Jake is bringing more attention to the shoe but it'd be hard to suggest that he's bringing enough attention to truly affect demand. More eyes on the shoe certainly can't diminish its value though."

 

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The Air Diors have a retail price of $3,000 but as previously mentioned it's impossible to find a pair retailing right now: the few pairs available on the aftermarket have an insane mark-up. Spending such a huge amount of money on a pair of basketball shoes might seem crazy to some, but Monardo explains that it's all part and parcel of the sneaker scene.

"Trends heavily influence the entire market, particularly the stock price. Your sneaker collection and the US stock market are both home to some of the world’s most iconic brands and are influenced by global trends and supply and demand. If the trend is popular, it’s likely that brands will continue to mimic the design in an attempt to accelerate overall company worth."

Normal sneakerheads already struggle to get their hands on limited releases, between the rampant online botting, backdooring for friends and family at retail locations, not to mention the influencers and the wealthy getting sneaky pre-releases. As we mentioned at the start of this piece, Paul desecrating such a hyped pair of shoes has gone down terribly online.

Some further choice comments include:

"Please, take a million and try to buy a brain" - @panchoparra

"@dior at least send the kicks to someone who respects em 🤦🤷‍♂️" - @kothari96

We couldn't agree more.

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Easy Superhero Cape for Kids!


I’m not sure if she saw it on TV somewhere lately or if we’ve just been watching too much Buzz Lightyear, but either way, Lola’s been wearing a baby blanket around her shoulders and running around the house shouting “SUPER LOLA!” while flying though the air. I love when she uses her imagination and I wanted to foster that kind of play, so I decided that she needed a superhero cape to make her play complete! I searched through my fabric/sewing drawers and found a few things to make a simple cape with and I thought I’d share with you how to make one too!

Supplies:
-1 1/2 yard of fabric for outside
-1 1/2 yard of fabric for inside
stretch glitter ribbon for trim (optional)
glitter fabric sheets for name
-felt fabric sheets for rainbow and stars (or whatever other decoration you want to add)
fabric glue
-sewing machine
-fabric scissors and straight pins
-1″ double fold bias tape (or extra fabric to make your own bias tape)

SIDE NOTE: This cape can be washable or not just depending on what items you choose to decorate the cape with, so if you want it to be washable, just choose all items that can be washed!

You can change the size cape you want pretty easily, but what I did was to lay my outside fabric down on the floor and traced half a pot lid that was about 7″ wide to be the neck of my cape. Then I just measured out 17.5″ away from the curve of the lid to get the curve of my cape and cut that shape out with fabric scissors.


Use that shape as a pattern to cut another layer for the inside of your cape. You can do two of the same color or you can make the inside a different color like I did with the light purple.
Now, before we put our two cape layers together, decide if you want to sew on or glue on your cape decorations. If you want to sew them then you’ll want to sew on your elements to each appropriate side before putting them together. But if you want to glue them on, then you can go ahead and assemble your cape and then glue the design on. I did a combo of both so I sewed on some elements, assembled the cape, and then glued on the rest of the pieces. I just cut out some rainbow arches from some felt sheets as the main decoration for my cape, but you can do whatever shape you want or just keep it simple with stars or their name.
Once I sewed on my felt shapes (I glued them down lightly first to keep them in place while sewing), it was time to assemble the two layers of my cape.
Place your fabric layers right sides together and then pin the cape all the way around with straight pins.
Sew all the way around the edge with a 1/2″ seam allowance and leave a 3″ gap for you to turn your cape right side out through. I would also clip the corners of your cape and make notches all along the neck hole so the fabric will lay flatter once turned out.

Turn your cape through the hole and use an iron to press your seams flat. I would suggest pressing the seams at your neck area first and then ironing the cape outwards from that point to the outer edge so your two layers lie perfectly flat with each other (I just pressed the seams along all the edges without doing that, so I ended up with a little bit of bubbling in the fabric—whoops!).

Topstitch all the way around the edge of your cape with a 1/4″ seam allowance as this will help your cape layers lie flat and will also close up the 3″ gap you left for turning the cape.
If you want to do a decorative trim around the edge, pin it all the way around the edge of the top layer of the cape, avoiding the neck area. Sew your trim on with a corresponding colored thread (I just sewed once around close to the inside edge of the trim and then again close to the outside edge).

Now that my trim was on, I added the rest of my glued elements like Lola’s name in sparkle fabric and some yellow stars for the inside of the cape.

So cute!

Next, to complete the cape, we just need a tie for the neck! If you have 1″ doubled folded bias tape you can use that for the tie, but if you don’t have any on hand (or not in a color you like), you can also make some with extra fabric from your cape’s top layer.

Cut a piece of fabric that’s 4″ x 48″ (or two pieces of fabric that are 4″ x 24″ long if you don’t have a piece that long and sew them together like I did), but you want to cut it on the bias of your fabric (that just means to cut it on an angle so it has more stretch to it). Once it’s cut, you’ll fold the 4″ wide tape down the length of the middle, and use an iron to press it and make a crease so you can see that middle line. Then, you’ll fold both outer edges inward to almost touch that middle line and press it flat all the way down the tape (it should look like the tape does at the top of the picture above). Once you have the folded 2″ wide tape, fold the halves together again and press it so you have a 1″ wide tape with 4 layers of fabric folded inside.

To finish the edges of the bias tape so it doesn’t unravel, unfold just the edge and cut the last 1/2″ at an angle like you see above and fold in and press the last 1/2″ of fabric. Then refold it all back into the 1″ wide tape that it was folded into before and you’ll see that your cut edge is now hidden and tucked up inside the tape.

Pin your bias tape centered around the neck of your cape so the cape is sandwiched in the middle of the tape opening and sew your bias tape all the way around the edges with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Remove the pins and your cape is ready to wear!

Lola was so excited to wear her cape that the glue didn’t quite have time to dry yet, so I had to reattach a few stars once she was done with the first playtime—haha! She mostly loves to yell “to in-fid-did-dy … ah beyoooond!” like Buzz Lightyear and jump off the front porch in the cape, but it makes my heart so happy to see her zooming around the yard in this and see how “official” the cape makes her feel. Hope this project helps to brighten up some days for a little one in your life! xo. Laura

P.S. Lola’s cute little outfit is from June and January, one of my fave places for kid’s clothes!

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Easy Superhero Cape For Kids!

Author Laura Gummerman

Ingredients

  • 1 1/2 yard of fabric for outside
  • 1 1/2 yard of fabric for inside
  • 3 yards stretch glitter ribbon for trim (optional)
  • glitter fabric sheets for name
  • felt fabric sheets for rainbow and stars (or whatever other decoration you want to add)
  • fabric glue
  • sewing machine
  • fabric scissors and straight pins
  • 1″ double fold bias tape (or extra fabric to make your own bias tape)

Instructions

  • You can change the size cape you want pretty easily, but what I did was to lay my outside fabric down on the floor and traced half a pot lid that was about 7″ wide to be the neck of my cape. Then I just measured out 17.5″ away from the curve of the lid to get the curve of my cape and cut that shape out with fabric scissors.
  • Use that shape as a pattern to cut another layer for the inside of your cape. You can do two of the same color or you can make the inside a different color like I did with the light purple.
  • Now, before we put our two cape layers together, decide if you want to sew on or glue on your cape decorations. If you want to sew them, then you’ll want to sew on your elements to each appropriate side before putting them together. But if you want to glue them on, then you can go ahead and assemble your cape and then glue the design on. I did a combo of both, so I sewed on some elements, assembled the cape, and then glued on the rest of the pieces. I just cut out some rainbow arches from some felt sheets as the main decoration for my cape, but you can do whatever shape you want or just keep it simple with stars or their name.
  • Once I sewed on my felt shapes (I glued them down lightly first to keep them in place while sewing), it was time to assemble the two layers of my cape.
  • Place your fabric layers right sides together and then pin the cape all the way around with straight pins.
  • Sew all the way around the edge with a 1/2″ seam allowance and leave a 3″ gap for you to turn your cape right side out through. I would also clip the corners of your cape and make notches all along the neck hole so the fabric will lay flatter once turned out.
  • Turn your cape through the hole and use an iron to press your seams flat. I would suggest pressing the seams at your neck area first and then ironing the cape outwards from that point to the outer edge so your two layers lie perfectly flat with each other (I just pressed the seams along all the edges without doing that, so I ended up with a little bit of bubbling in the fabric—whoops!).
  • Topstitch all the way around the edge of your cape with a 1/4″ seam allowance as this will help your cape layers lie flat and will also close up the 3″ gap you left for turning the cape.
  • If you want to do a decorative trim around the edge, pin it all the way around the edge of the top layer of the cape, avoiding the neck area. Sew your trim on with a corresponding colored thread (I just sewed once around close to the inside edge of the trim and then again close to the outside edge).
  • Now that my trim was on, I added the rest of my glued elements like Lola’s name in sparkle fabric and some yellow stars for the inside of the cape.
  • Next, to complete the cape, we just need a tie for the neck! If you have 1″ doubled folded bias tape you can use that for the tie, but if you don’t have any on hand (or not in a color you like) you can also make some with extra fabric from your cape’s top layer.
  • Cut a piece of fabric that’s 4″ x 48″ (or two pieces of fabric that are 4″ x 24″ long if you don’t have a piece that long and sew them together like I did), but you want to cut it on the bias of your fabric (that just means to cut it on an angle so it has more stretch to it). Once it’s cut, you’ll fold the 4″ wide tape down the length of the middle, and use an iron to press it and make a crease so you can see that middle line. Then you’ll fold both outer edges inward to almost touch that middle line and press it flat all the way down the tape (it should look like the tape does at the top of the picture above). Once you have the folded 2″ wide tape, fold the halves together again and press it so you have a 1″ wide tape with 4 layers of fabric folded inside.
  • To finish the edges of the bias tape so it doesn’t unravel, unfold just the edge and cut the last 1/2″ at an angle like you see above and fold in and press the last 1/2″ of fabric. Then refold it all back into the 1″ wide tape that it was folded into before and you’ll see that your cut edge is now hidden and tucked up inside the tape.
  • Pin your bias tape centered around the neck of your cape so the cape is sandwiched in the middle of the tape opening and sew your bias tape all the way around the edges with a 1/4″ seam allowance. Remove the pins and your cape is ready to wear!
Credits//Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.

Louis Vuitton ‘Holy Trinity’ Gives Hypebeasts What They’ve Always Wanted

When Virgil Abloh was appointed as artistic director of Louis Vuitton's menswear line in 2018, it immediately sent shockwaves through the fashion industry.

Already well-known for his postmodern approaches to art and streetwear through his labels Off-White and Pyrex Vision; creative collaborations...

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No-Sew Braided Velvet Headband


Headbands are just a fun accessory, as they can totally add a lot to a look and it only takes seconds to throw one on and take your look up a few notches. It was a lot easier than I thought to make a padded headband, so I thought it would also be fun to do a no-sew option with a braided version, as I’ve seen those all over my Pinterest feed as well lately. The no-sew makes it super easy and you can whip up a batch of these for gifts or in different colors for yourself in no time! I made a thicker/wider version for myself and a thinner version to match with my daughter Lola. Here’s what to do for both:
Supplies:
-1/4 yard of velvet fabric
-fabric scissors
-rotary cutter, ruler and mat (optional)
-hot glue gun
-ribbon that matches the color of the velvet
-headbands (I used this thick one for me and this thin one for Lola)
-straight pins

For the first step, you’ll want to cover your headband with some velvet so it matches seamlessly with your braid on top. Cut a band of velvet as long as your headband and as wide as the circumference of the widest part of your headband. Place your headband in the middle of the velvet so it’s covering the underside and use your hot glue to glue the velvet to the length of the underside of the headband. Fold up the velvet on one side and cut it so it covers half of the top of your headband. Repeat the process with the other side so your underside is fully covered and you have a seam running down the middle of the top of your headband (it can overlap a little or just have the sides meet together in the middle, either way it will be covered so it doesn’t matter very much).

For the wider headband, cut three strips of velvet that are 25″ long and 4″ wide (and for the smaller headband cut them 25″ long and 3″ wide). Fold your strips in half lengthwise and stack the three strips on top of each other so you can braid them together. Use a straight pin to keep the three strips together and set something heavy on that end so you can braid the tails (you could set it under a couch leg or something while you braid or get someone else to hold it for you). You’ll want to twist the strands so that the cut side of the fabric stays on the bottom side at all times, so just keep checking that your cut ends are hidden and twist/rotate the fabric as needed to make that happen.

Once your braid is complete, place it against your headband to check the length and trim it if it’s longer than your headband length. Once you have a good length, you can unbraid the last 3″ of each end to gradually cut some of the fabric strip width off of the ends of the tails (as you see above in the photo). That will make the ends less bulky and tapered a bit as the braid ends on each side. Once you remove as much bulk as you want, rebraid and pin your ends together, then use a hot glue gun to glue the ends together.
Now that your braid is the right length and tapered, glue it to the topside of your velvet headband with a generous amount of hot glue.
Take some ribbon and fold and glue the cut edges so you have a strip about 2 1/4″ long with folded edges on both sides (so the ribbon won’t unravel).
Starting on the underside of the headband, glue the start of the strip folded side down and wrap it around the end of your headband so that it overhangs the headband just a little. Wrap it around and glue it in place on the underside. Use some glue in the overhang opening of the ribbon and pinch that opening shut while the glue sets to finish off the ends. Once your glue has set, your headband is ready to wear!

SO cute! You can either make the thinner version for a kiddo to match with like I did, or make it for yourself if you just want a look that’s a little less dramatic. Either way, this is a super easy way to create a pretty look for any occasion and I realized that if you make this in a color similar to your own hair color, it will look like you have an awesome headband braid braided into your hair … I think I’m going to make another one in a tan color for just that reason! xo. Laura

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No-Sew Braided Velvet Headband

Make a braided velvet headband
Author Laura Gummerman

Ingredients

  • 1/4 yard of velvet fabric
  • fabric scissors
  • rotary cutter, ruler and mat (optional)
  • hot glue gun
  • ribbon that matches the color of the velvet
  • headbands (I used this thick one for me and this thin one for Lola)
  • straight pins

Instructions

  • For the first step, you’ll want to cover your headband with some velvet so it matches seamlessly with your braid on top. Cut a band of velvet as long as your headband and as wide as the circumference of the widest part of your headband. Place your headband in the middle of the velvet so it’s covering the underside and use your hot glue to glue the velvet to the length of the underside of the headband. Fold up the velvet on one side and cut it so it covers half of the top of your headband. Repeat the process with the other side so your underside is fully covered and you have a seam running down the middle of the top of your headband (it can overlap a little or just have the sides meet together in the middle, either way it will be covered so it doesn’t matter very much).
  • For the wider headband, cut three strips of velvet that are 25″ long and 4″ wide (and for the smaller headband cut them 25″ long and 3″ wide). Fold your strips in half lengthwise and stack the three strips on top of each other so you can braid them together. Use a straight pin to keep the three strips together and set something heavy on that end so you can braid the tails (you could set it under a couch leg or something while you braid or get someone else to hold it for you). You’ll want to twist the strands so that the cut side of the fabric stays on the bottom side at all times, so just keep checking that your cut ends are hidden and twist/rotate the fabric as needed to make that happen.
  • Once your braid is complete, place it against your headband to check the length and trim it if it’s longer than your headband length. Once you have a good length, you can unbraid the last 3″ of each end to gradually cut some of the fabric strip width off of the ends of the tails (as you see above in the photo). That will make the ends less bulky and tapered a bit as the braid ends on each side.
  • Once you remove as much bulk as you want, rebraid and pin your ends together then use a hot glue gun to glue the ends together.
  • Now that your braid is the right length and tapered, glue it to the topside of your velvet headband with a generous amount of hot glue.
  • Take some ribbon and fold and glue the cut edges so you have a strip about 2 1/4″ long with folded edges on both sides (so the ribbon won’t unravel).
  • Starting on the underside of the headband, glue the start of the strip folded side down and wrap it around the end of your headband so that it overhangs the headband just a little. Wrap it around and glue it in place on the underside. Use some glue in the overhang opening of the ribbon and pinch that opening shut while the glue sets to finish off the ends. Once your glue has set, your headband is ready to wear!
Credits // Author and Photography: Laura Gummerman. Photos edited with A Color Story Desktop.